About these ads

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Toyota’

16-31 March 2014 Cyber Attacks Timeline

And here we are with the second part of the Cyber Attacks Timeline (first part here).

The prize for the most noticeable breach of the month goes in Korea, where a 31-year-old man has been arrested for infiltrating the account of 25 million users of Never, a local Internet Portal (actually it happened several months ago but was unveiled in this month). Other noticeable events include the trail of attacks against several Universities (Maryland, Auburn, Purdue, Wisconsin-Parkside), the compromising of personal information of 550,000 employees and users of Spec’s, the leak of 158,000 forum users of Boxee.tv and 95,000 users of Cerberus and, finally, a breach targeting the California Department of Motor Vehicles. Last but not least, even the infamous Operation Windigo has deserved a mention in the timeline.

Moving to Hacktivism, chronicles report of a couple of hijackings performed, as usual, by the Syrian Electronic Army, a couple of operations carried on by the Russian Cyber Command and a (probably fake) attack by someone in disguise of Anonymous Ukraine, claiming to to have leaked 7 million Russian Credit Cards. Probably a recycle of old leaks.

As usual, if you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

16-31 Mar 2014 Cyber Attacks Timelines Read more…

About these ads

16-30 June 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline

It’s time for the second part of the June 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline (first part here).

The last two weeks of June have been characterized by an unusual cyber activity in the Korean Peninsula. In a dramatic escalation of events (coinciding with the 63rd anniversary of the start of the Korean War), both countries have attracted the unwelcome attentions of hacktivists and (alleged) state-sponsored groups, being targeted by a massive wave of Cyber attacks, with the South suffering the worst consequences (a huge amount of records subtracted by the attackers).

On the hacktivism front, the most remarkable events involved some actions in Brazil and Africa, and the trail of attacks in Turkey that even characterized the first half of the month. The chronicles of the month also report an unsuccessful operation: the results of the so-called OpPetrol have been negligible (most of all in comparison to the huge expectations) with few nuisance-level attacks.

On the cyber crime front, the most remarkable events involved the attacks against Blizzard, that forced the company to temporarily close mobile access to its auction service, a serious breach against a Samsung service in Kazakhstan, a targeted attack against the internal network of Opera Software (aimed to steal code signing certificates) and several attacks to some DNS registrars. In particular the most serious has been perpetrated against Network Solutions, affecting nearly 5000 domains, among which LinkedIn.

As usual, if you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

16-31 June 2013 Cyber Atacks Timeline Read more…

15-31 May 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline

And here we are with the second part of the Cyber Attacks Timeline for May (first part here).

The second half of the month has shown an unusual activity with several high-profile breaches motivated by Cyber-Crime or Hacktivism, but also with the disclosure of massive Cyber-Espionage operations.

The unwelcome prize for the “Breach of the Month” is for Yahoo! Japan, that suffered the possible compromising of 22 million users (but in general this was an hard month for the Far East considering that also Groupon Taiwan suffered an illegitimate attempt to access the data of its 4.1 million of customers).

On the cyber-espionage front, the leading role is for the Chinese cyber army, accused of compromising the secret plans of advanced weapons systems from the U.S. and the secret plans for the new headquarter of the Australian Security Intelligence Organization.

On the Hacktivism front, this month has been particularly troubled for the South African Police, whose web site has been hacked with the compromising of 16,000 individuals, including 15,700 whistle-bowlers.

Other noticeable events include the unauthorized access against the well known open source CMS Drupal (causing the reset of 1 million of passwords), the trail of hijacked Twitter accounts by the Syrian Electronic Army and also an unprecedented wave of attacks against targets belonging to Automotive.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

May 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline Part II Read more…

Categories: Cyber Attacks Timeline, Security Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

16-30 September 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline

October 4, 2012 2 comments

Part One with 1-15 September 201 Timeline Here.

September is over and it’s time to analyze this month from an Information Security perspective with the second part of the Cyber Attack Timeline.

Probably this month will be remembered for the massive outage of six  U.S. Banks (Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, U.S. Bank, Wells Fargo and PNC ) caused by a wave of DDoS attack carried on by alleged Muslim hackers in retaliation for the infamous movie (maybe this term is exaggerated) “The Innocence of Muslims”.

China has confirmed its intense activity inside the Cyber space. Alleged (state-sponsored?) Chinese hackers were allegedly behind the attack to Telvent, whose project files of its core product OASyS SCADA were stolen after a breach, and also behind a thwarted spear-phishing cyber attack against the White House.

Adobe suffered a high-profile breach which caused a build server to be compromised with the consequent theft of a certificate key used to sign two malware strains found on the wild (with the consequent necessary revoke of the compromised key affecting approximately 1,100 files).

Last but not least, the Hacktivism fever has apparently dropped. September has offered some attacks on the wake of the #OpFreeAssange campaign, and a new wave of attacks at the end of the month after the global protests set for September, the 29th, under the hashtag of #29s.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011 and 2012 and the related statistics (regularly updated), and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

Read more…

Categories: Cyber Attacks Timeline, Security Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

16 – 31 August 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline

September 5, 2012 Leave a comment

Here the first part with the timeline from 1 to 15 August 2012.

Here we are with the second part of the August 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline. A second part of the month that has been characterized by hacktivism, most of all because of the so-called OperationFreeAssange, which has targeted many high-profile websites.

Among the targets of the month, Philips has been particularly “unlucky”. The Dutch giant has been the victim of three Cyber Attacks, even if there are several doubts about the authenticity of the hacks.

But maybe the biggest operation of the month is the #ProjectHellFire, carried on by the collective @TeamGhostShell, that has unleashed something as 1 million of accounts belonging to different sectors (banks, government agencies, consulting firms, law enforcement and the CIA). And the group promises new action for this Fall and Winter.

The Middle East confirms to be very hot, with a new Cyber Attack, probably another occurrence of Shamoon, targeting RasGas, yet another Oil Company.

Just one note: of course it is impossible to track all the targets of the #OpFreeAssange. You can find a complete list at cyberwarnews.info.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011 and 2012 and the related statistics (regularly updated), and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

Read more…

Categories: Cyber Attacks Timeline, Security Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

February 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline (Part I)

February 16, 2012 1 comment

February 2012 brings a new domain for my blog (it’s just a hackmaggedon) and confirms the trend of January with a constant and unprecedented increase in number and complexity of the events. Driven by the echo of the ACTA movement, the Anonymous have performed a massive wave of attacks, resuming the old habits of targeting Law Enforcement agencies. From this point of view, this month has registered several remarkable events among which the hacking of a conf call between the FBI and Scotland Yard and the takedown of the Homeland Security and the CIA Web sites.

The Hacktivism front has been very hot as well, with attacks in Europe and Syria (with the presidential e-mail hacked) and even against United Nations (once again) and NASDAQ Stock Exchange.

Scroll down the list and enjoy to discover the (too) many illustrious victims including Intel, Microsoft, Foxconn and Philips. After the jump you find all the references and do not forget to follow @paulsparrows for the latest updates. Also have a look to the Middle East Cyberwar Timeline, and the master indexes for 2011 and 2012 Cyber Attacks.

Addendum: of course it is impossible to keep count of the huge amount of sites attacked or defaced as an aftermath of the Anti ACTA movements. In any case I suggest you a couple of links that mat be really helpful:

Read more…

Categories: Cyber Attacks Timeline, Cyberwar, Security Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Prossimo Optional in Auto? L’Antivirus!

Tra le poche certezze che “guidano” i miei gusti automobilistici vi è sicuramente l’amore incondizionato per il Biscione (anche se da troppo tempo in cerca di tempi migliori). Anche se il mio feeling con la Casa del Portello è attualmente nel bel mezzo della classica “pausa di riflessione”, questo non mi ha comunque portato ad abbandonare il Blue&Me, il sistema multimediale del Gruppo Fiat, basato su tecnologie Microsoft, al quale mi sono oramai abituato e del quale non potrei più fare a meno.

Certo mi sono chiesto tante volte le implicazioni in termini di sicurezza nell’inserire una porzione del codice a finestre di Redmond all’interno di un automobile, e più in generale nel demandare ad un sistema operativo embedded il controllo di alcuni parametri dell’automobile; ma fino ad oggi (a parte il caso della presunta infezione Toyota poi rivelatosi una bufala) non c’è stata mai occasione (e necessità) di approfondire la questione. In realtà mi è sempre rimasto il dubbio della privacy (chissà quanti proprietari di auto dotate di sistema Blue&Me si ricordano di cancellare la rubrica quando restituiscono o vendono l’auto oppure, in teoria, la lasciano in officina), ma non è niente di particolare in quanto si tratta dell’ennesima minaccia, questa volta a quattro ruote, per i nostri dati che oggigiorno vivono letteralmente circondati da occasioni di breccia.

Questo perlomeno fino a pochi giorni orsono, quando mi sono imbattuto in una di quelle notizie che certamente non passano inosservate: un gruppo di ricercatori, coordinati da Tadayoshi Kohno, professore associato al dipartimento di Informatica dell’Università di Washington, e Stefan Savage, professore di Informatica dell’informatica dell’Università di San Diego ha effettuato uno studio di due anni, presentato la settimana scorsa al National Academies Committee on Electronic Vehicle Controls and Unintended Acceleration, inerente la sicurezza dei sistemi multimediali che equipaggiano le automobili, giungendo alla  sconfortante conclusione che è possibile, sfruttando le vulnerabilità di questi, ottenere da remoto il controllo pressoché totale dell’autovettura.

I nostri, che non sono nuovi ad imprese del genere, erano già riusciti in passato a prendere il controllo remoto di una berlina con accesso fisico (ovvero mediante la porta diagnostica). Nella circostanza attuale la situazione è notevolmente diversa dal momento che il controllo è stato ottenuto mediante software malevolo iniettato nel sistema di diagnostica e, fatto ancor più sconcertante, mediante la connessione bluetooth del dispositivo (con un dispositivo già accoppiato o accoppiato illecitamente) o anche, addirittura, per mezzo di codice malevolo nascosto su una traccia audio di 18 secondi riprodotta dal lettore multimediale di bordo.

L’exploit è stato portato a compimento su berline medie appartenenti al mercato americano equipaggiate con i sistemi multimediali GM Onstar e Ford Sync, ma questo non vuol dire che la distanza che ci separa dagli States e la diversità di mercato e modelli ci possa far rimanere virtualmente tranquilli.

Architettura di Windows Embedded Automotive, tratta da: “A Technical Companion to Windows Embedded Automotive 7″

Il sistema Ford infatti è parente prossimo del “nostrano” Blue&Me del Gruppone Nazionale Italo-Americano: entrambi affondano una matrice comune nelle Finestre di Redmond, ed in particolare nella declinazione automotive del Sistema Operativo Microsoft denominata Windows Embedded Automotive 7 (e versioni precedenti). Analizzando le specifiche del sistema operativo (auto)mobile si scopre infatti che l’architettura non è un semplice centro di infotainment, ma un framework completo che consente di dialogare con tutti i componenti dell’autovettura grazie ad appositi driver (nativi o di terze parti) per connettere il processore principale, o il co-processore, al bus di comunicazione dei componenti automobilistici, basato su CAN o IEEE 1394 (il firewire automobilistico) o anche di eventuali altri componenti Multimediali basato su MOST. Questo spiega perché, ad esempio, nel caso Fiat sia possibile tramite la chiavetta USB verificare i consumi e le emissioni CO2 della propria autovettura tramite l’applicazione Ecodrive, oppure, come nel caso di Ford l’applicazione Sync possa essere utilizzata anche per informazioni diagnostiche.

Le applicazioni per il sistema multimediale di bordo possono essere sviluppate mediante Visual Studio 2008 e fanno uso degli usuali cavalli di battaglia dell’ecosistema applicativo di Redmond quali Silverlight, ed il sistema di riconoscimento vocale Tellme.

Naturalmente ad oggi non ci sono ancora notizie di attacchi perpetrati sfruttando le vulnerabilità dei sistemi multimediali di ultima generazione (e l’exploit confezionato sopra descritto ha richiesto un lavoro di 10 ricercatori per ben 2 anni apparendo, allo stato attuale, difficilmente replicabile), tuttavia la notizia suona come un campanello di allarme che i costruttori farebbero bene ad ascoltare, soprattutto nel momento in cui si stanno aprendo a standard di tipo open e approntando, come nel caso di Ford, un ecosistema di applicazioni intorno al proprio sistema multimediale. D’altronde non siamo di certo abituati a pensare che l’elettronica (ABS, Airbag, ESP, etc.) di un automobile qualunque di ultima generazione può ormai contare su un numero di ECU (Unità di Controllo Elettronico governate da Microprocessore) compreso tra 50 e 70 (che scende a “sole” 30 e 50 nel caso delle utilitarie) tra loro interconnesse mediante il bus sincrono CAN sopra citato e governate da circa 100 milioni di linee di codice. Il che suona sorprendente se si considera che un F-22 Raptor, ha circa un decimo delle linee di codice (“solo” 1.7  milioni), l’F-35 Joint Strike Fighter ne avrà circa 5.7 milioni e il Boeing 787 Dreamliner a grandi inee 6.5 millioni per gestire avionica e sistemi di bordo.

I possibili scenari di attacco sono estremamente variegati e spaziano dalla possibilità di controllare a piacimento la posizione dell’autovettura dei nostri sogni (mediante il GPS integrato), con l’intenzione di rubarla alla prima occasione utile; sino al sabotaggio remoto agendo su freni, sterzo, chiusura centralizzata, etc. Il tutto magari iniziato da una traccia MP3 donataci da un ignoto (ma non troppo) benefattore (ma non si accettano mai caramelle dagli sconosciuti, nemmeno sotto forma digitale). Il quadro è presumibilmente destinato a peggiorare in quanto sono allo studio sistemi V2V (Veichle2Veichle) e V2I (Veichle2Infrastructure) che consentiranno, tramite connessione Wi-Fi e GPS, di far dialogare i veicoli tra loro (o con apposite infrastrutture) al fine di evitare collisioni e incidenti (ironia della sorte, proprio Ford ha recentemente presentato il proprio prototipo V2V). Per non volare troppo con la fantasia, ometto i veicoli elettrici in cui l’elettronica avrà un ruolo ancora maggiore (e che magari si connetteranno alle smart-grid, sulle cui implicazioni di sicurezza ho già avuto modo di discutere). Non è un caso che alcuni costruttori stiano già correndo ai ripari, ad esempio tramite il progetto EVITA (E-safety Vehicle Intrusion Protected Applications) finalizzato proprio a rendere sicure le comunicazioni V2V o V2I ed EVITAre quindi imbarazzanti intrusioni nelle stesse da parte di cybercriminali a quattro ruote.

Chissà, è possibile che nella prossima auto (spero sia un’Alfa Romeo Giulia, magari a trazione posteriore) dovrò richiedere l’antivirus come optional, o forse sarà già di serie…

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,094 other followers