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July 2014 Cyber Attacks Statistics

August 11, 2014 Leave a comment

It’s time to aggregate the data of the timelines of July (Part II and Part II) into (hopefully) meaning stats.

Before drilling down into the numbers, a recommendation is necessary: I will never give up repeating that these stats are necessarily an approximation since the sample is very heterogeneous, and just like all approximations they could leave some shadow zones. An example for this month is represented by the tide of cyber attacks under the umbrella of #OpSaveGaza. I am not interested to enumerate all the single attacks (also because it would be virtually impossible), so this operation appears like a single entry in the stats. Of course you have any suggestion to cope with such similar situations, they are absolutely more than welcome.

So, after this tedious, but necessary introduction, let’s rock with the data.

The Daily Trend of Attacks shows quite a fragmented trend with a peak towards the end of the month. It is interesting to notice the general break during weekends. This probably depends on the collection methodology: when possible, if the information is known, I try to insert the date when the attack really happened, but in several cases this information is not available, so the reported date is the one when the attack was initially published in the news, which obviously happens less likely during weekends.

Daily Trend of Attacks July 2014

The Motivations Behind Attacks chart confirms Cyber Crime at number one with 59% of occurrences (a slight decrease compared to 65% of June). The staggering news is the resounding 18% of Cyber Espionage, confirmed the growing coverage for Targeted Attacks (they are almost always related to Cyber Espionage). Hacktivism is substantially stable at 23%, was 24% previous month).

Motivations July 2014

But the surprises continue! The Distribution Of Attack Techniques reveals an unprecedented 18.2% of targeted attacks, allowing this category to attain a deserved first place (shared with the category of unknown attacks). Defacement is immediately after (15.2%), while the other categories are further behind. It is also interesting to notice the decrease of DDoS and SQLi.

Techniques July 2014

Confirming the trend of the last months, Industry leads the Distribution of Targets Chart with 30.3%. Governmental targets rank at number two, 16.7%, well ahead of Organizations at number three with 16.7%. Values substantially in line with the ones of June.

Targets July 2014

A detailed analysis of Industrial targets shows a predominance of targets belonging to E-Commerce, Tourism and Restaurant. While Non-Profit entities lead the corresponding chart for organizations.

Industry Drilldown 2014Org Drilldown July 2014

As I mentioned before and always repeat, please bear in mind that the sample must be taken very carefully since it refers only to discovered attacks included in my timelines. The sample does not pretend to be exhaustive but only aims to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”, or at least of the ones that gained space in the media (yes, using an abused expression this is just the tip of the Iceberg).

Additionally, if you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012, 2013 and now 2014 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics.

Of course follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates, and feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

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June 2014 Cyber Attacks Statistics

It’s time to aggregate the Cyber Attacks Timelines of June (Part I and Part II) into statistics.

So, as usual, let’s start with the Daily Trend of Attacks chart, which shows quite an irregular trend with a sharp peak on the 11th.

Daily Attack Trend June 2014

The Motivations Behind Attacks chart confirms once again Cyber Crime at number one with 65% of occurrences. Overall the values are almost specular to the previous month. Particularly meaningful is the 11% of operations motivated by Cyber Espionage.

Motivations June 2014

The Distribution Of Attack Techniques chart shows a 27.4% of unknown attacks, a result in line with the previous month when this value was 26%. The rise of DDoS is another interesting aspects (this technique is increasingly used to blackmail victims), as also the 9.7% of targeted attacks, a relatively high value for this class, and, again, in line with the previous month.

Techniques June 2014

Once again, Industry leads the Distribution of Targets Chart with 35.5%. Governmental targets rank at number two, close to 20%, well ahead of Organizations at number three with a modest 6.5%.

Targets June 2014

Drilling down the Distribution of targets belonging to industry, shows quite an heterogeneous landscape. Software industries lead the chart with 22.7%, followed by Restaurants (??) with 13.6% and Financial Services (9.1%). All the other categories are well behind with a “flat” 4.5% each.

Industry Drill Down Jun 2014

As usual, please bear in mind that the sample must be taken very carefully since it refers only to discovered attacks included in my timelines. The sample does not pretend to be exhaustive but only aims to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”, or at least of the ones that gained space in the media (yes, using an abused expression this is just the tip of the Iceberg).

Additionally, if you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012, 2013 and now 2014 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics.

Of course follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates, and feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

May 2014 Cyber Attack Statistics

Update on 19/06/2013: I had to update the graph since, in compiling the first timeline of June, I discovered two attacks that apparently fell off my radar: the DDoS attacks to Moz and Plenty of Fish.

I found the time to aggregate the timelines of May (part I and part II) to derive some interesting stats. As a general rule, since many readers often pose the same questions, all the stats are derived from the Cyber Attacks Timelines I publish (almost) bi-weekly.

As I noticed previously in these pages, looks like attackers are just waiting for the Summer, since the number of events in May has experienced a sensible decreease.

The Daily Trend Of Attacks chart shows quite a linear trend with two small peaks around the 15 and 30 May. Overall the activity appears quite limited.

Trend May 2014

Cyber Crime rocks! This is the outcome of the Distribution of Attacks chart, showing a 67% of attacks carried on for criminal purposes. Particularly interesting is also the 11% of reported attacks related to Cyber Espionage.

Motivations May 2014

And in (too) many cases the reason of the attacks is unknown. At least this is what the Distribution of Attack Techniques chart states. Other interesting findings include the rise of Account Hijackings and the noticeable 9% of Targeted Attack (an high incidence this month, undoubtedly related to the similar high incidence of Cyber Espionage).

Techniques May 2014

And last but not least, the Distribution of Targets chart shows a predominance of attacks against Industry (41%), twice the occurrences related to Governmental targets (20%). Targets belonging to Educational institutions rank at number three with “only” the 9%.

Distribution May 2014

Drilling down the Industrial targets provides further interesting findings. Cyber Crime rules and, maybe not a coincidence, targets related to E-Commerce rank at number one (after all this was the month of the Ebay breach) together with software industries (18.2% both). Entertainment rank at number three with 13.6% each.

Industry May 2014

As usual, please bear in mind that the sample must be taken very carefully since it refers only to discovered attacks included in my timelines. The sample does not pretend to be exhaustive but only aims to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”, or at least of the ones that gained space in the media (yes, using an abused expression this is just the tip of the Iceberg).

Of course follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

4 Years of Cyber Attacks

I would like to thank once again ISMS Forum Spain for having invited me at their XV Jornada Internacional de ISMS Forum: La Sociedad Digital, entre Confianza y Ciber-riesgos.

I was part of a very interesting panel “Fighting Cyber Threats” during which I was given the opportunity to show some stats collected from my blog.

Here’ s the presentation I showed. Hope it is useful to spread awareness.

Please read carefully the caveats. As always the data cannot be exhaustive, nevertheless they are useful to provide an overview of what’s going on!

Jan-Apr 2014 Cyber Attacks Statistics

I have been quite busy in the last few months, so, unfortunately, I was not able to keep the pace with the statistics derived from my Cyber Attacks Timelines. However, thanks to the ISMS Forum Spain (Asociación Española para el Fomento de la Seguridad de la Información), I have been invited to take part at the XV Jornada Internacional de ISMS Forum: La Sociedad Digital, entre Confianza y Ciber-riesgos (to be held on May, the 28th in Madrid).

Taking advantage of this awesome opportunity, I have been able to reorganize the data collected so far for the events recorded in 2014.

What I show below, is a synthesis of this work. Further information will be presented in Madrid, and later in my blog. Meanwhile, I hope the information provided will satisfy the readers who kindly asked for an update of the stats.

Let us start with the Daily Attack Trend Chart.

Daily Attack Trend Jan-Apr 2014

Needless to say, the crooks have started this infosec year with the brakes on. Apart from few noticeable examples (for instance the peak on the 20th of April due to the NullCrew collective), the activity is quite low in comparison with the past years (again a full analysis will be shown in Madrid).

Drilling down the Daily Attack Trend:

Daily Attack Trend Drill Down Jan-Apr 2014

Shows a constant ‘bias’ of events related to Cyber Crime with some isolated peaks of Hacktivism. This is also evident from the Motivations Behind Attacks Chart.

Motivations Jan-Apr2014

Here the Cyber Crime dominates the chart, accounting for the 61% of the total events. Nearly twice more than Hactkivism, stuck to a ‘modest’ 31%. On the other hand Cyber Espionage and Cyber Warfare are quite stable at the values of 2013 when they were respectively at the 5% and 4% (but do not get carried away, the end of the year is far away and there is time to change along the way).

And the fall of Hacktivism finds another indirect confirm in the Distribution of Attack Techniques Chart:

Attack Techniques Jan-Apr2014Apparently fewer and fewer information is disclosed, so nearly one fifth of the recorded attacks if of uncertain origin. However both DDoS and SQLi confirmed the decreasing trend. On the other hand Account Hijacking maintains its growing trend (was 9% in 2013).

Last but not least, the Distribution of Targets chart:Targets Jan-Apr2014Targets belonging to industry rank at number one with the nearly 30% of occurrences, well ahead of governmental targets (at number two with nearly 19%) and organizations (at number three with nearly 12%). The others are behind (luckily for them).

Well, that’s all folks… At least so far… As I said before further data will follow…

As usual, please bear in mind that the sample must be taken very carefully since it refers only to discovered attacks, published in the news, and included in my timelines. The sample cannot be exhaustive but only aims to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

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2013 Cyber Attacks Statistics (Summary)

January 19, 2014 8 comments

This post has been possible thanks to the contribution of @piz69, who kindly (and patiently) took care to aggregate the data for 2013!

Finally we can consolidate the data related to 2013 and draw some global stats summarizing the infosec landscape for the past year. Of course this data cannot absolutely pretend to be exhaustive, but rather we could define the charts  as macro-indicators of the threat landscape and the corresponding trend, since the sources of the timelines (from which the stats are derived) are open and therefore only show cyber attacks that were discovered and gained space in the news.

Before drilling down into the data for the past year, it’s worth to have a look to the trend of the last three years (with the caveat that data for 2011 are incomplete as it was consolidated into a form comparable with 2012 and 2013 only starting from September).

Apparently 2012 and 2013 have a very different shape: 2012 shows a constant trend (with a high activity between May and June), while, after an initial peak, the line for 2013 experiences a progressive decrease, reaching a stable state. This is probably due to the minor influence of attacks motivated by hacktivism throughout the year (see the next chart).

2011-2012-Summary

2011-2013 Data Trend (data for 2011 consolidated starting from September)

A closer look to 2013 allows to understand the influence of the motivations throughout the different months. The initial part of the year is characterized by hacktivism. Cyber Crime is quite constant and ends up dominating the second half. This trend does not mean a decrease of hacktivism, but rather a different connotation throughout the year: the global-scale operations executed by the Anonymous have progressively been replaced by local phenomena (for instance the cyber attacks in India and Pakistan). Also the first months of the year are influenced by the DDos attacks of Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Cyber Fighters against US Banks.

2013-Summary

2013 Attack Trend with the Drill-down of Motivations

Exploring the motivations shows a slight advantage of Cyber Crime (47%) over Hacktivism (44%), well above Cyber Espionage (5%) and Cyber Warfare (4%).

2013-Motivations

Motivations Behind Attacks (2013)

DDoS leads the chart of known Attack Techniques (23%) ahead of SQLi (19%) and Defacements (14%). It’s also worth to mention the rank number five achieved by Account Hijacking (with 9%) and the growing influence of Targeted Attacks ranking at number six with 6%.

2013-Attacks

Top 10 Attack Techniques (2013)

Governments and Industries have been the most preferred targets for Cyber Attackers with similar values (respectively 23% and 22%). Targets belonging to finance rank at number three (7%), immediately ahead of News (6%) and Education (5%).

2013-Targets

Top 10 Targets (2013)

And, last but not least, the Top 10 Countries chart is lead by US which suffered nearly 1 attack on 2, well ahead of UK (5%) and India (3%).

2013-Countries

Top 10 Countries (2013)

As usual, bear in mind that the sample must be taken very carefully since it refers only to discovered attacks, published in the news, and included in my timelines. The sample cannot be exhaustive but only aims to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011 and 2012. You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

December 2013 Cyber Attack Statistics

January 15, 2014 Leave a comment

It’s time for the statistics derived from the Cyber Attacks Timelines of December (Part I and Part II).

As a consolidated tradition, the first chart to be shown is the Daily Attack Trend, which shows quite a constant trend with two peaks just at the beginning and at the end of the month.

December 2013 Daily Attack Trend

The Country Distribution Chart is quite monotonous: as usual the United States lead the chart (with nearly one half of the recorded attacks), well above UK (at rank number two with 8%). The other countries are quite far this month…

December 2013 Country Distribution

The Motivations Behind Attacks chart shows a clear predominance of Cyber Crime (62%) against Hacktivism (34%), a sharp increase of the first in comparison with the previous month when the values were respectively 53% and 45%.

December 2013 Motivations

Well, 28.4% of attacks into the Distribution of Attack Techniques chart are without a known origin (a sharp increase in comparison to 23.1% of the previous month). Defacements plummeted at 18.9% in comparison to 29.7% of the previous month), while DDoSes are in slight increase with 17.9% (was 15.4 one month ago). It is also interested to notice the growth of SQLi, at 12.6% against 4.4% of November.

December 2013 Distribution

Last but not least, the Distribution of Target chart, where a change at rank number one happened. In practice industry and government targets swapped their positions (with similar values in comparison to the previous month). Financial targets close the podium, leaving behind the other categories.

December 2013 Targetspng

As usual, please bear in mind that the sample must be taken very carefully since it refers only to discovered attacks, published in the news, and included in my timelines. The sample cannot be exhaustive but only aims to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

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November 2013 Cyber Attacks Statistics

December 8, 2013 Leave a comment

It’s time to summarize the Cyber Landscape of November, extracting the corresponding statistics from the two two timelines of November (part I and part II).

Let us begin with the Attack Trend. From this point of view November has been quite active and stable (despite some breaks in the trend).

Attack Trend November 2013

The attacks executed by Pakistani hackers against India and Indonesian hackers against Australia influence the Country Distribution Chart, which is led, as usual, by the US, well above these two countries.

Country Distribution November 2013

Cyber Crime leads the Motivations Behind Attacks chart (53%), even if the spread with hacktivism (45%) is much smaller in comparison with the previous month when the two were respectively at 63% and 33%. For the second consecutive month, apparently, I have recorded no operations related to Cyber Warfare.

Motivations November 2013

The Distribution of Attack Techniques Chart sees Defacement at number one for the third consecutive month with 29.7%. DDoS ranks at number three with 15.4%, more than five points above Account Hijacking, which ranks at number four with 9.9. SQLi is constantly decreasing and this month ranks at number six with 4.4%.

Attacks November 2013

The Distribution of Targets chart confirms governments at number one with 29.3% and industries at number two with 25%. What is also interesting to notice in this month is the presence into the chart of Bitcoin Wallets, an increasingly interesting prey for Cyber Criminals, at rank number seven with 3.3%. Entertainment and Software lead the drill-down chart for Industries, while Political Parties (quite obviously) lead the one for Organizations.

Targets November 2013

As usual, please bear in mind that the sample must be taken very carefully since it refers only to discovered attacks, published in the news, and included in my timelines. The sample cannot be exhaustive but only aims to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

October 2013 Cyber Attacks Statistics

November 17, 2013 1 comment

Time has come for the October 2013 Cyber Attacks Statistics. As usual they summarize in an analytic form the findings contained in the October 2013 Cyber Attacks timelines (part I and part II) and aim to provide a snapshot of the landscape related to Cyber Attacks reported in the news.

Let us begin with the Daily Trend of Attacks. The October graph shows quite a constant trend with two peaks around the 3 and (most of all) the 16.

October 2013 Trend

As usual, the US lead the Country Distribution Chart. India (4%) ranks at number two, a consequence of the continuous cyber attacks by Pakistani hackers, while Israel and UK (3%) are on an equal footing at the third place.

October 2013 Country Distribution

The Motivations Behind Attacks chart shows a clear predominance of Cyber Crime (63%), in net growth compared with the 44% of September. Hacktivism ranks at number two, and obviously in net decrease in comparison with 33% of the previous month. Apparently I have recorded no operations related to Cyber Warfare.

October 2013 Motivations

The Distribution of Attack Techniques confirms Defacement at number one with 27.2%. DNS Hijacking (9.8%) is for the first time in the podium at number three, while DDoS and SQLi, used to be steadily in the higher positions, are respectively at number four (8.7%) and five (7.6%), immediately ahead of Account Hijacking (5,4%) in net decrease in comparison with 20% of the previous month.

October 2013 Distribution Of Attack Techniques

Nothing surprising for the Distribution of Targets chart, which confirms governments at number one (23.9%), and industries at number two (16.3%). Targets belonging to Organizations complete the podium with 8.7%. Drilling down to industry fragmentation, software companies clearly lead the chart with 40%.

October 2013 Targets

As usual, please bear in mind that the sample must be taken very carefully since it refers only to discovered attacks, published in the news, and included in my timelines. The sample cannot be exhaustive but only aims to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

September 2013 Cyber Attacks Statistics

October 20, 2013 Leave a comment

Even if with a small delay, it is time for the Cyber Attacks Statistics derived from the Cyber Attacks Timelines of September (Part I and Part II).

As usual let us begin with the Daily Trend of Attacks chart. The chart shows a clear peak on September, 27th, due to a wave of attacks of the Anonymous against the Cambodian Government. In general, the number of attacks reported on the news had an increase in the second part of the month.

September 2013 Daily Trend

No surprisingly, US lead the Country Distribution chart. Also, it is worth to mention the second place of Cambodia, as a direct consequence of the wave of attacks carried on by the Anonymous collective. India is in the middle of a Cyber War against Pakistan and this explains his bronze medal just ahead of UK.

September 2013 Country Distribution

The Motivations Behind Attacks chart shows an unexpected overtake of Hacktivism on Cyber Crime. It’s also worth to mention the unusual level of attacks motivated by Cyber Espionage, jumped to a noticeable 10%: better countermeasures that allow to discover a growing number of sophisticated cyber attacks or a consequence of the marketing hype? In any case September has been particularly hard for Oil and Energy Sector that suffered several targeted campaigns.

September 2013 Motivations

The Distribution of Attack Techniques chart is completely unedited. Looks like hacktivists are shifting their preferences to other “unconventional weapons” such as Defacements and Account Hijackings. Maybe these techniques grant more visibility and less risks for the authors. Surprisingly for this month DDoS has fallen to 9% from 17.8% of the previous month. On the other hand targeted attacks are stable at 4%.

September 2013 Distribution

The Distribution of Targets chart confirms governments at number one, just ahead targets belonging to industry. Targets belong to Law Enforcements gained several positions in comparison with the previous month, raising at number three with 6%. Drilling down to industry fragmentation, financial services and E-Commerce lead the chart.

September 2013 Target Distribution

As usual, please bear in mind that the sample must be taken very carefully since it refers only to discovered attacks, published in the news, and included in my timelines. The sample cannot be exhaustive but only aims to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

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