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Posts Tagged ‘LulzSec’

March 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline (Part II)

First Part: March 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline (Part I)

It is time for the second part of the March 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline, a month that will probably be remembered for the breach occurred to Global Payments, a credit card processor, whose aftermath may potentially affect up to 10 million credit card holders belonging, among the others, to Visa and MasterCard.

On the hacktivism front, not even three weeks after the arrest of several LulzSec members, a new hacking crew has appeared whose name, LulzSecReborn, clearly reminds the infamous collective and its Days of Lulz. They entered the scene with a noticeable, albeit discussed, leak: more than 170.000 records from a military dating site.

Other remarkable hacktivism-led cyber attacks include the so called #OpFariseo, a wave of Cyber Attacks targeting websites related to the visit of the Pope in Mexico, and a new cyber attack to PBS. It is also important to notice the debut of the Anonymous in China, a debut characterized by a massive wave of defacements.

Last but not least, among the events of this month there is one which in particular deserves a mention, and is the leak which targeted Vector Inc., a Japanese computer selling firm, potentially affecting more than 260,000 users.

As usual after the jump you will find all the references.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011 and 2012 (regularly updated), and follow @pausparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

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Doxed on Pastebin

March 7, 2012 1 comment

Hacktivists and Information Security Professionals could not believe their eyes while reading the breaking news published by Fox News according to which the infamous Sabu, the alleged leader of the LulzSec collective, has been secretly working for the government for months and played a crucial role for the raids which today led to the arrests of three members of the infamous hacking collective with two more charged for conspiracy.

You will probably remember that the hacking collective which, in its “50 days of Lulz” become the nightmare for System Administrators and Law Enforcement Agencies all over the Globe, suddenly decided to give up, on June the 25th, in a completely unexpected way, leaving their supporters and followers completely surprised, but also leaving the heritage of a name which has become a synonym for hacktivism (also because of their pact with the Anonymous, with whom they are often associated, in the name of the #Antisec movement).

Even after the group left the scene, Sabu has continued to constantly tweet and comment the events through his “official” Twitter account @anonymouSabu, probably a fake or a diversionary tactic, since it looks like that Sabu had already been arrested by the FBI since June, the 7th, more than a couple of weeks before the breakdown of the group,

At that time, the hacking group was hunted by Law Enforcement Agencies and several Grayhats as well (among all @th3j35ter, the A-Team and Web Ninjas whose blog, lulzsecexposed.blogspot.com, unfortunately is no longer available).

Curiously, it looks like that Sabu had already been “doxed” since then. At that time many claimed to have revealed the identity of the members: there was no day without a new pastebin promising to expose new information. But if you have a look at them, they all have only one thing in common, and it is just the identity of Xavier Monsegur (or Montsegur), also known as Sabu. The truth was very close and before everybody eyes: on pastebin.

June, 28th 2011: http://pastebin.com/qmP7R49Y

The real identity of the other members is not still completely known, but for sure it is not a coincidence that no one of the pastebins was able to guess anyone else except Sabu, who hence was the first to be arrested, well before the rest of the group.

School of Hacktivism

March 2, 2012 2 comments

A like Anonymous

There are really few doubts, this is the most (in)famous hacking collective. There is no new day without a new resounding action. They are Anonymous. They are Legion. They do not forgive. They do not forget. Expect Them.

B like Barrett Brown

Considered one of the early members, Barrett Brown is the alleged spokesperson of Anonymous.

C like Chanology (AKA Project Chanology, AKA Operation Chanology)

A protest movement against the practices of the Church of Scientology by Anonymous. The project (or Operation) was started in response to the Church of Scientology’s attempts to remove material from a highly publicized interview with Scientologist Tom Cruise from the Internet in January 2008 and was followed by DDoS attacks and other actions such as black faxes and prunk calls.

D like DDoS

Distributed Denial of Service (abbreviated DDoS) is the preferred weapon by Hackitivsts, since it does not need particular hacking skills and may also be centrally controlled (with a hive mind who define the target). The preferred tool for perpetrating DDoS attacks is LOIC, although next-gen tools are under development.

E like Encyclopædia Dramatica

A satirical open wiki, launched on December 10, 2004 and defunct on April 14 2011. It is considered one of the sources of inspiration for The Anonymous.[1]

F like Fawkes Guy AKA Fawkes Guido

Guy Fawkes (13 April 1570 – 31 January 1606), also known as Guido Fawkes, belonged to a group of provincial English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot, a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England. His stylised mask designed by illustrator David Lloyd and used as a major plot element in the “V for Vendetta“ Comic Book, is the symbol for the Anonymous. The failure of the Gunpowder plot has been commemorated in England since 5 November 1605.

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January 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline (Part 1)

January 15, 2012 2 comments

Click here for part 2.

New year, new Cyber Attacks Timeline. Let us start our Information Security Travel in 2012 with the chart of the attacks occurred in the first fifteen days of January. This month has been characterized so far by the leak of Symantec Source Code and the strange story of alleged Cyber Espionage revolving around it. But this was not the only remarkable event: chronicles tell the endless Cyber-war between Israel and a Saudi Hacker (and more in general the Arab World), but also a revamped activity of the Anonymous against SOPA (with peak in Finland). The end of the month has also reserved several remarkable events (such as the breaches to T-Mobile and Zappos, the latter affecting potentially 24,000,000 of users). In general this has been a very active period. For 2012 this is only the beginning, and if a good beginning makes a good ending, there is little to be quiet…

Browse the chart and follows @paulsparrows to be updated on a biweekly basis. As usual after the jump you will find all the references. Feel free to report wrong/missing links or attacks.

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One Year Of Lulz (Part I)

December 15, 2011 2 comments

Update December 26: 2011 is nearly gone and hence, here it is One Year Of Lulz (Part II)

This month I am a little late for the December Cyber Attacks Timeline. In the meantime, I decided to collect on a single table the main Cyber Attacks for this unforgettable year.

In this post I cover the first half (more or less), ranging from January to July 2011. This period has seen the infamous RSA Breach, the huge Sony and Epsilon breaches, the rise and fall of the LulzSec Group and the beginning of the hot summer of Anonymous agsainst the Law Enforcement Agencies and Cyber Contractors. Korea was also affected by a huge breach. The total cost of all the breaches occurred inthis period (computed with Ponemon Institute’s estimates according to which the cost of a single record is around 214$) is more than 25 billion USD.

As usual after the page break you find all the references.

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Attacks Raining Down from the Clouds

November 22, 2011 Leave a comment

Update November 24: New EU directive to feature cloud ‘bridge’. The Binding Safe Processor Rules (BSPR) will ask cloud service providers to prove their security and agree to become legally liable for any data offences.

In my humble opinion there is strange misconception regarding cloud security. For sure cloud security is one of the main trends for 2011 a trend, likely destined to be confirmed during 2012 in parallel with the growing diffusion of cloud based services, nevertheless, I cannot help but notice that when talking about cloud security, the attention is focused solely on attacks towards cloud resources. Although this is an important side of the problem, it is not the only.

If you were on a cybercrook’s shoes eager to spread havoc on the Internet (unfortunately this hobby seems to be very common recent times), would you choose static discrete resources weapons to carry on your attacks or rather would you prefer dynamic, continuous, always-on and practically unlimited resources to reach your malicious goals?

An unlimited cyberwarfare ready to fire at simple click of your fingers? The answer seems pretty obvious!

Swap your perspective, move on the other side of the cloud, and you will discover that Security from the cloud is a multidimensional issue, which embraces legal and technological aspects: not only for cloud service providers but also for cloud service subscribers eager to move there platforms, infrastructures and applications.

In fact, if a cloud service provider must grant the needed security to all of its customers (but what does it means the adjective “needed” if there is not a related Service Level Agreement on the contract?) in terms of (logical) separation, analogously cloud service subscribers must also ensure that their applications do not offer welcomed doors to cybercrooks because of vulnerabilities due to weak patching or code flaws.

In this scenario in which way the two parties are responsible each other? Simply said, could a cloud service provider be charged in case an attacker is able to illegitimately enter the cloud and carry on attack exploiting infrastructure vulnerabilities and leveraging resources of the other cloud service subscribers? Or also could an organization be charged in case an attacker, exploiting an application vulnerability, is capable to (once again) illegitimately enter the cloud and use its resources to carry on malicious attacks, eventually leveraging (and compromising) also resources from other customers? And again, in this latter case, could a cloud service provider be somehow responsible since it did not perform enough controls or also he was not able to detect the malicious activity from its resources? And how should he behave in case of events such as seizures.

Unfortunately it looks like these answers are waiting for a resolutive answer from Cloud Service Providers. As far as I know there are no clauses covering this kind of events in cloud service contracts, creating a dangerous gap between technology and regulations: on the other hands several examples show that similar events are not so far from reality:

Is it a coincidence the fact that today TOR turned to Amazon’s EC2 cloud service to make it easier for volunteers to donate bandwidth to the anonymity network (and, according to Imperva, to make easier to create more places and better places to hide.)

I do believe that cloud security perspective will need to be moved on the other side of the cloud during 2012.

November 2011 Cyber Attacks Timeline (Part I)

November 17, 2011 5 comments

Update 12/01/2011: November Cyber Attacks Timeline (Part II)

This first half of November has been very hard for Steam. The Valve Online Gaming Platform suffered a security breach putting at risk a potential sample of 37 million of users and hence wins the crown for the Major Breach of the First Half of November.

Also a sportswear giant like Adidas fell among the victims of cybercriminals, with a “sophisticated attack” targeting 500,000 users.

This month was also hot for the Cold Finland which has suffered two security breaches involving more than 30,000 users (a third breach also happened on November, the 16th, affecting 16,000 users but of course will be reported in the next report).

Two other CAs (KPN and Digicert Sdn Bhd Malaysia, not to be confused with Digicert US-based CA) were compromised. Also F-secure discovered a sample of malware signed with a valid certificate stolen from a Malasyan company.

On a larger scale, after 2 years of hunt, FBI uncovered a huge Botnet in Estonia, which stole $14 million from 4 million users worldwide, while on the other side of the Globe, Brazilian ISPS were targeted by a massive DNS Poisoning attack.

Not even Facebook was safe this month, whose (too) many users were targeted with a malware posting pornographic images on their wall exploiting an Internet Explorer Vulnerability.

As far as hactivism is concerned, the political events in the real world had a predictable echo in the Cyber space, with an attack to Palestine the day after the nation was admitted as a full member of UNESCO.

As a retaliation, some Israeli Government web sites were targeted with a wave of DDoS attacks by the infamous Anonymous hacking group. In any case the Anonymous were active also in other Cyberwar fronts acting a couple of defacements and DDoS (in one case they targeted the Muslim Brotherhood) and were also the authors to one of the two attacks in Finland (the one towards a right-wind party).

A group of Hackers called TeaMp0isoN claimed to have hacked more than 150 Email Id’s of International Foreign Governments even if this statement is controversial.

What is not controversial is the Cyberwar declared against Mexico which was targeted, in November, by a massive waves of Cyber Attacks.

Besides these noticeable events, the month was characterized by many other minor attacks and dumps among which, particularly noticeable are: the attacks to a couple of banks (DDoS and defacements) and Universities (UCLA and Standford hit by data breaches), and the Fox Business Twitter Account Hacking (Oops they did it again!).

The month ends with the first example of malware targeting ambulance.

Please notice that I decided henceforth not to insert attacks targeting a limited amount of users and most of all, claimed without clear evidence: in this month I discovered a claimed fake attack to Italian Police announced recycling old data.

  1. http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/nov/01/palestinians-hit-cyber-attack-unesco
  2. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/02/dump-of-steam-accounts/
  3. http://www.symantec.com/content/en/us/enterprise/media/security_response/whitepapers/the_nitro_attacks.pdf
  4. http://thehackernews.com/2011/11/fraud-communities-owned-and-exposed-by.html
  5. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/03/opdarknet-official-and-last-release/
  6. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/03/accounts-dumped-from-hiphopinstrumental-net/
  7. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/03/peru-government-websites-defaced-by-challenges-hackers/
  8. http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/11/03/another-certificate-authority-issues-dangerous-certficates/
  9. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/04/bayareaconnection-net-defaced/
  10. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/04/yet-another-pointless-account-dump-hundreds-dumped-from-www-jjs2-com/
  11. http://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/another-dutch-ca-kpn-stops-issuing-certificates-after-finding-ddos-tool-server-110411
  12. http://thehackernews.com/2011/11/capitalone-bank-taken-down-by-anonymous.html
  13. http://www.networkworld.com/news/2011/110411-hacker-selling-access-to-compromised-252771.html?source=nww_rss
  14. http://www.phiprivacy.net/?p=8227
  15. http://thehackernews.com/2011/11/anonymous-attack-on-israeli-government.html
  16. http://www.itworld.com/security/222033/fake-threat-against-facebook-dwarfs-anonymous-real-attacks-israel-finland-portugal
  17. http://pplware.sapo.pt/informacao/site-freeport-pt-foi-atacado-entre-outros/
  18. http://www.databreaches.net/?p=21359
  19. http://www.itworld.com/security/222033/fake-threat-against-facebook-dwarfs-anonymous-real-attacks-israel-finland-portugal
  20. http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T111105002386.htm
  21. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/08/massive-amount-of-accounts-dumped-from-adidas-com/
  22. http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/07/adidas_hack_attack/
  23. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/08/massive-amount-of-accounts-dumped-from-adidas-com/
  24. http://thehackernews.com/2011/11/international-foreign-government-e.html
  25. http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/09/teamp0ison_publishes_stupid_password_list/
  26. http://news.softpedia.com/news/16-000-Finns-Affected-by-Data-Breach-232851.shtml
  27. http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/11/08/anonymous-attacks-el-salvadoran-sites/
  28. http://www.smh.com.au/business/privacy-of-millions-at-mercy-of-a-usb-device-20111107-1n3wm.html
  29. http://thehackernews.com/2011/11/ump-french-political-party-got-hacked.html
  30. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/08/premierleaguepool-co-uk-accounts-dumped-by-sen/
  31. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/08/60k-accounts-dumped-from-ohmedia-by-teamswastika/
  32. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/08/dump-of-accounts-from-beachvolley-se/
  33. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/08/khadraglass-com-hacked-and-accounts-dumped-by-inj3ct0r/
  34. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/09/scamming-email-account-dumpers-are-surfacing-50k-french-accounts-dumped/
  35. http://thehackernews.com/2011/11/possible-credit-card-theft-in-steam.html
  36. http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2011/november/malware_110911/malware_110911
  37. http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/10/it_manager_charges/
  38. http://thehackernews.com/2011/11/bangladesh-supreme-court-website-hacked.html
  39. https://twitter.com/#!/igetroot/status/134865652543520768
  40. http://thehackernews.com/2011/11/operation-brotherhood-shutdown-by.html
  41. http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/11/14/ambulance-service-disrupted-by-computer-virus-infection/
  42. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/12/ucla-department-of-psychology-hacked-by-inj3ct0r/
  43. http://www.ehackingnews.com/2011/11/social-network-site-findfriendzcom.html
  44. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/13/dump-of-information-by-inj3ct0r/
  45. http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/archives/00002269.html
  46. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/14/dump-of-accounts-from-congress-of-sonora/
  47. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/14/2-more-government-dumps-by-metalsoft-team/
  48. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/14/another-big-dump-of-accounts-from-sec404-mexican-hackers/
  49. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/14/another-mexican-government-congress-hacked-canaldelcongreso-gob-mx/
  50. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/14/dump-of-data-from-another-mexican-congress-sinaloa-state-congress/
  51. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/14/ministry-of-economy-mexico-hacked-by-sec404/
  52. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/14/unit-of-transparency-and-access-to-public-information-website-hacked/
  53. http://www.cyberwarnews.info/2011/11/14/national-commission-of-physical-culture-and-sport-hacked-and-accounts-leaked/
  54. http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/11/14/hacked-sky-news-twitter-account-james-murdoch-arrested/
  55. http://news.softpedia.com/news/Anonymous-Attacks-Anonymous-For-Being-Trolls-234949.shtml
  56. http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/11/16/facebook-explains-pornographic-shock-spam-hints-at-browser-vulnerability/
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