About these ads

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Hacker’

April 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline (Part I)

April 16, 2012 2 comments

As usual, here is the list of the main cyber attacks for April 2012. A first half of the month which has been characterized by hacktivism, although the time of the resounding attacks seems so far away. Also because, after the arrest of Sabu, the law enforcement agencies (which also were targeted during this month, most of all in UK), made  two further arrests of alleged hackers affiliated to the Anonymous Collective: W0rmer, member of CabinCr3w, and two possible members of the infamous collective @TeaMp0isoN.

In any case, the most important breach of the first half of the month has nothing to deal with hacktivism, targeted the health sector and occurred to Utah Department of Health with potentially 750,000 users affected. According to the Last Ponemon Study related to the cost of a breach ($194 per record) applied to the minimum number of users affected (250,000), the monetary impact could be at least $ 55 million.

Another interesting event to mention in the observed period is also the alleged attack against a Chinese Military Contractor, and the takedown of the five most important al-Qaeda forums. On the hacktivist front, it worths to mention a new hijacked call from MI6 to FBI, but also the alleged phone bombing to the same Law Enforcement Agency. Both events were performed by TeamPoison, whose two alleged members were arrested the day after.

For the sample of attacks I tried to identify: the category of the targets, the category of the attacks, and the motivations behind them. Of course this attempt must be taken with caution since in many cases the attacks did not target a single objective. Taking into account the single objectives would have been nearly impossible and prone to errors (I am doing the timeline in my free time!), so the data reported on the charts refer to the single event (and not to all the target affected in the single event).

As usual the references are placed after the jump.

By the way, SQL Injection continues to rule (the question mark indicates attacks possibly performed by SQL Injection, where the term “possibly” indicates the lack of direct evidences…).

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011 and 2012 (regularly updated), and follow @pausparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Read more…

About these ads
Categories: Cyber Attacks Timeline, Security Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Timeline of Cyber War Between Bangladesh and India (Part II)

March 26, 2012 1 comment

Part I: The list of Cyber Attacks Carried On by Bangladesh Hackers against India

The second part of this post covers the cyber attacks carried on by Indian hackers against Bangladesh. Apparently their number is smaller but a deeper analysis shows a sharper strategy focused on paralyzing the financial system of Bangladesh.

In this first quarter of 2012, the cyber war between the two countries went through two different phases: until the beginning of March, the two opposite factions faced themselves with sparse defacement and DDoS actions (unchained after the attacks following the India Republic Day). After March we entered the Cyber War 2.0 characterized by High Profile actions, most of all suffered by Bangladesh, that led to the takedown of the Stock Exchange and one important Bank.

Again, thanks to Catherine for collecting the data.

Of course do not forget to follow @paulsparrows for the latest updates on the (too many) Cyber Wars, being fought on the underground of our planet.

Read more…

January 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline (Part 2)

February 2, 2012 1 comment

Click here for part 1.

The second half of January is gone, and it is undoubtely clear that this month has been characterized by hacktivism and will be remembered for the Mega Upload shutdown. Its direct and indirect aftermaths led to an unprecedented wave of cyber attacks in terms of LOIC-Based DDoS (with a brand new self service approach we will need to get used to), defacements and more hacking initiatives against several Governments and the EU Parliament, all perpetrated under the common umbrella of the opposition to SOPA, PIPA and ACTA. These attacks overshadowed another important Cyber Event: the Middle East Cyberwar (which for the sake of clarity deserved a dedicated series of posts, here Part I and Part II) and several other major breaches (above all Dreamhost and New York State Electric & Gas and Rochester Gas & Electric).

Chronicles also reports a cyber attack to railways, several cyber attacks to universities, a preferred target, and also of a bank robbery in South Africa which allowed the attackers to steal $6.7 million.

Do you think that cyber attacks in this month crossed the line and the Cyber Chessboard will not be the same anymore? It may be, meanwhile do not forget to follow @paulsparrows to get the latest timelines and feel free to support and improve my work with suggeastions and other meaningful events I eventually forgot to mention.

Read more…

Categories: Cyber Attacks Timeline, Cyberwar, Security Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

When Faith Meets Hackers

April 5, 2011 2 comments

Today many Italian newspapers devoted their front page to an interesting article issued by Civiltà Cattolica (Catholic Civilization), the regular fortnightly published by “La Compagnia di Gesù (Society of Jesus), the religious order of jesuits, entitled “Etica Hacker e Visione Cristiana” (Hacker Ethic and Christian Vision). In this Article, Antonio Spadaro, Jesuit, Italian theologian, writer, and a specialist in new technologies for the Holy See, analyzes the world of hackers looking for points in common with the Christian philosophy. The article is quite complex and fascinating, but there are some real interesting hints.

Although some assertions are not fully shareable (and the article begins with the predictable differentiation between hackers and crackers), there are some surprisingly points which, according to the author, are common to the hacker ethic and the Christian vision because;

That hacker is, in short, a sort of “philosophy” of life, of existential attitude, playful and committed, which encourages creativity and sharing, as opposed to models of control, competition and private property. So We can guess as properly speaking of hackers we are facing not problems of criminal nature, but to a vision of work human knowledge and life. It poses questions and challenges as ever

But probably the most interesting (and hazardous) point, relies on the parallelism between God’s Work and the action of a hacker, supported by quoting the work by Pekka HimanenThe Hacker Ethic”, that takes its cue from a question of St. Augustine: “Why God created the world?” The hacker answer to the question of St. Augustine is that God, as being perfect, did not need do anything, but just wanted to create, and in this sense God might be indicated as a model for the hacker if not the first hacker…

Of course summarizing a so complex article with few words might lead to misunderstanding, also because I found some inconsistencies in it, the most marked of which is represented by the fourth of the “7 Commandments of the Personal Computer Revolution” which Steven Levy forged in his Hackers, that states:

Mistrust authority – promote decentralization.

Which sounds a bit too far from the Christian Vision. As a matter of fact, promoting an “horizontal” interconnected world with no authority and hierarchy, just too different from the vertical impulse proper of the transcendent thrust of believers towards God, we could define it a model that is hierarchical by definition. Moreover to this discrepancy I add that the fact that the open source model is more similar to an open bazaar than a monolithic cathedral (quoting the work The Cathedral and The Bazaar by Eric S. Raymond).

Anyway I must confess that, although I started reading the article with a little bit of suspicion, I ended up appreciating the content that gave to me a complete new and different key of understanding (sometimes a bit forced actually) of the hacker ethic in a religious perspective, and even if you are not believers, it is in any case an original point of view to analyze. If you have some time do dedicate (it is a quite complex reading), you may find the original article, in Italian, here.

A Personal Note

I enjoyed so much in learning that Larry Wall, the inventor of Perl, with whom I played many nights when I was younger, is an evangelical Christian, and the name itself of its creature (Practical Extraction Reporting Language) is a biblical reference to the “pearl of great price” (Matthew 13:46).

Gears Of Cyberwar

January 19, 2011 1 comment

Il 2010 verrà ricordato tra gli annali della sicurezza informatica soprattutto per due eventi: Operation Aurora e Stuxnet. Sebbene estremamente diversi tra loro per natura e origine (nel primo caso si parla di un attacco perpetrato dalla Cina per rubare informazioni di dissidenti e nel secondo caso di un malware progettato da USA e Israele con lo scopo di sabotare le centrali nucleari iraniane), i due eventi sono accomunati da un minimo comune denominatore: la matrice politica, ovvero il fatto che la minaccia informatica sia stata creata a tavolino per azioni di spionaggio nel primo caso e guerra sabotaggio nel secondo.

Secondo le indicazioni dei principali produttori di sicurezza sembra proprio che nel 2010 sarà necessario abituarsi a convivere con eventi di questo tipo, effettuati per scopi politici da nazioni fazioni sempre più organizzate utilizzando come vettori minacce simil-stuxnet sempre più elaborate e complesse.  In sostanza la percezione è che, dopo l’esempio dell’Estonia nel 2007, le guerre si possano sempre di più combattere dietro le tastiere piuttosto che nei campi di battaglia. Dopo le fosche tinte delineate da così  poco promettenti previsioni, naturalmente la domanda sorge spontanea: quale potrebbe essere nell’immediato futuro l’impatto globale di una cyber-guerra?

In realtà molto basso secondo un recente studio dell’OCSE, l’Organizzazione per la Cooperazione e lo Sviluppo Economico, ad opera di Peter Sommer e Ian Brown. Lo studio difatti sostiene che, sebbene i governi debbano essere pronti a prevenire, affrontare ed effettuare il recovery da operazioni di Cyberwar, deliberate o accidentali, la probabilità dell’occorrenza di (e quindi gli effetti derivanti da) eventi di Cyber-guerra su scala globale è piuttosto ridotta. Questo, nonostante l’arsenale delle cosiddette cyberarmi sia oramai ampiamente diffuso e variegato, e includa tra l’altro: tecniche di accesso non autorizzato ai sistemi, rootkit, virus, worm, trojan, (distributed) denial of service mediante botnet, tecniche di social engineering che portano ad effetti nefasti compromissione della confidenzialità dei dati, furto di informazioni segrete, furto di identità, defacciamento, compromissione dei sistemi e blocco di un servizio.

Sebbene l’OSCE (come previsto da alcuni produttori) ritiene che le azioni di cyberguerra siano destinate ad aumentare, solo una concatenazione di eventi su scala globale (ad esempio la contemporaneità di un cyber-evento con pandemie, calamità naturali o terremoti fisici o bancari), potrebbe portare a conseguenze gravi su scala planetaria.

I motivi del ridotto impatto, secondo gli autori dello studio, sono i seguenti:

  • Gli impatti di eventi quali malware, DDoS, spionaggio informatico, azioni criminali, siano esse causate da hacker casuali o hacktivisti sono limitiate nello spazio (ovvero localizzate in una determinata regione) e nel tempo (ovvero di breve durata);
  • Attacchi sulla falsa riga di Stuxnet non sono così probabili poiché devono combinare diverse tecniche (uso massiccio di vulnerabilità 0-day, conoscenza approfondita della tecnologia vittima, possibilità di occultamento dell’attaccante e dei metodi utilizzati). In sostanza investimenti massicci, come anche dimostrato dalle recenti rivelazioni, secondo le quali lo sviluppo del malware Stuxnet ha richiesto oltre due anni di sviluppo da parte di due superpotenze.
  • Una vera e propria cyberguerra è improbabile poiché la maggior parte dei sistemi critici sono ben protetti dagli exploit e il malware conosciuto cosicché i “progettisti” delle nuove cyberarmi sono costretti a individuare nuove vulnerabilità e sviluppare ex novo i relativi exploit, e queste operazioni non sono immediate. Inoltre, poiché gli effetti dei cyberattacchi sono difficili da prevenire, le armi potrebbero essere meno potenti del previsto o peggio ritorcersi contro gli stessi creatori o i propri alleati.

Lo studio identifica anche i motivi che potrebbero facilitare azioni di Cyberguerra:

  • La tendenza dei Governi ad aprire i propri portali per applicazioni verso i cittadini o verso i propri contrattori. Sebbene questo porti ad economie di scala, i portali potrebbero diventare facili obiettivi per azioni nefaste (come accaduto in Estonia nel 2007);
  • La tecnologia cloud che apre la strada a nuovi servizi flessibili, ma anche a nuove problematiche di sicurezza ancora non completamente esplorate;
  • La tendenza dei Governi a dare in outsourcing le proprie infrastrutture IT. Sebbene questo fatto porti vantaggi dal punto di vista economico, i livelli di servizio potrebbero non essere adatti ad affrontare eventi eccezionali come un Cyber-attacco.
  • Il mancato principio di deterrenza per le Cyberguerre: dal momento che spesso le azioni malevole vengono effettuate da reti di macchine compromesse (le cosiddette botnet), non è così facile riconoscere il mandante con la conseguenza che non è applicabile l’equilibrio per le armi reali che ha sostenuto il mondo nel baratro del collasso nucleare ai tempi della guerra fredda.

Dobbiamo rassegnarci ad essere vittime impotenti di cyber-eventi? Fortunatamente no, anzi tra le azioni che potrebbero essere effettuate per contrastare un Cyber-attacco lo studio identifica:

  • Attività di risk analysis sponsorizzate dal top management: il retrofitting non è mai conveniente per cui dovrebbero essere effettuate campagne continue di gestione degli accessi, educazione degli utenti, frequenti audit di sistema, back-up puntuali, piani di disaster recovery e conformità con gli standard;
  • Contromisure tecnologiche continue quali: progettazione sicura dall’inizio, applicazione puntuale delle patch di sicurezza a sistemi e applicazioni, utilizzo di software anti-malware, firewall e sistemi di Intrusion Detection, utilizzo di tecnologie atte ad aumentare disponibilità, resilienza e affidabilità dei servizi;
  • Attività di Penetration Test possono essere utili per identificare buchi su sistemi e applicazioni (spesso immesse nel mercato dai produttori con un non sufficiente livello di maturità).
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,898 other followers