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Posts Tagged ‘FBI’

16-31 March 2014 Cyber Attacks Timeline

And here we are with the second part of the Cyber Attacks Timeline (first part here).

The prize for the most noticeable breach of the month goes in Korea, where a 31-year-old man has been arrested for infiltrating the account of 25 million users of Never, a local Internet Portal (actually it happened several months ago but was unveiled in this month). Other noticeable events include the trail of attacks against several Universities (Maryland, Auburn, Purdue, Wisconsin-Parkside), the compromising of personal information of 550,000 employees and users of Spec’s, the leak of 158,000 forum users of Boxee.tv and 95,000 users of Cerberus and, finally, a breach targeting the California Department of Motor Vehicles. Last but not least, even the infamous Operation Windigo has deserved a mention in the timeline.

Moving to Hacktivism, chronicles report of a couple of hijackings performed, as usual, by the Syrian Electronic Army, a couple of operations carried on by the Russian Cyber Command and a (probably fake) attack by someone in disguise of Anonymous Ukraine, claiming to to have leaked 7 million Russian Credit Cards. Probably a recycle of old leaks.

As usual, if you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

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16-31 January 2014 Cyber Attacks Timeline

February 17, 2014 Leave a comment

Even if with several days of delay, it is time for the second Cyber Attacks Timeline of June January 2014 (Part I here).

Unfortunately the trail of massive breaches has continued even in the second half of the month with the two remarkable events of the 16 million of records scraped by a German botnet and also the discovery of the ChewBacca malware by RSA. Cyber Crime Chronicles also report a global password reset issued by Yahoo! after the discovery of a coordinated effort to compromise accounts.

Cyber Espionage Chronicles report of an attempted malware attack against the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Israeli Defense Ministry and, most of all, the discovery of an operation allegedly orchestrated by Russian hackers against Western energy interests.

Looking at the attacks motivated by Hacktivism, the Syrian Electronic Army were behind the most noticeable events.

As usual, if you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

16-31 Jan 2014 Cyber Attacks Timeline

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1-15 November 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline

November 25, 2013 Leave a comment

It’s time for the summary of the main cyber attacks occurred in the first half of November and reported on the news.

These fifteen days have been particularly troubled from an information security perspective, having left to the records several remarkable breaches: LoyaltyBuild, affecting potentially 1.12 million individuals, CorporateCarOnline.com (850,000 individuals), MacRumors (850,000 individuals) and, last but not least, vBulletin (860,000 users affected). A damage report which appears really devastating.

But even hacktivists have been particularly active: several operations have been carried on by the Anonymous all over the world (Italy, UK, Singapore, Japan, Philippines and Ukraine). One in particular (by Indonesian hacktivists against Australian targets) has apparently created a fracture inside the collective.

Last but not least, the chronicles report the latest hack of the Syrian Electronic Army against VICE and a new wave of attacks of Pakistani hackers against Indian targets.

As usual, if you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).1-15 November 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline

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16-28 February 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline

It is time for the summary of the second half of February, two weeks of remarkable cyber attacks against high-tech giants, massive breaches and Twitter Account Hijackings.

Probably the most resounding events of this period (maybe more for the high profile of the victims than for the actual effects) are the two attacks, allegedly originating from China, (with a common root cause, the compromising of an iPhone developer forum) carried on against Apple and Microsoft.

But not only the two high-tech giants, other illustrious victims have fallen under the blows of hacktivists and cyber criminals. The list is quite long and includes Bank of America, American Express, Casio, ZenDesk, cPanel, Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation, etc.).

Last but not least, the unprecedented trail of Cyber attack against Twitter Profile belonging to single individuals (see Donald Trump) or Corporations (Burger King and Jeep). Maybe it is time to change the passwords…

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011, 2012 and now 2013 (regularly updated). You may also want to have a look at the Cyber Attack Statistics, and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

A special thanks to Kim Guldberg AKA @bufferzone for continuously advising me about significant cyber events through the Submit Form! Much Appreciated!

16-28 February 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline

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1-15 December 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline

December 17, 2012 2 comments

Christmas is coming quickly, we have just passed the first half of December, and hence it’s time for the first update of the Cyber Attacks Timeline for December.

The Team GhostShell has decided to close the year with a clamorous Cyber Attack, and hence,as part of the project ProjectWhiteFox, has leaked 1.6 million of accounts from several organizations all over the world. This is the most important event for this first part of the month that apparently has shown a decreasing trend. Hacktivists are still focusing their attention (and their keyboards) to Israel, and Cyber Criminals are maybe preparing for the Christmas attacks.

However, the main events of the first half of December, are related to hacktivism, besides the above mentioned cyber attack, it worth to mention the new wave of massive DDoS attacks against US Banks (up to 60 Gbps of peak according to Arbor Networks), but also the leak of a ITU document on the future of Deep Packet Inspection and the attacks in Egypt, Mexico and India.

Last but not least: this two weeks also offered a giant attack to the famous Social Platform Tumblr and also the warning of the Switzerland’s national security agency (NDB) that a huge amount of secrets may have been leaked by a disgruntled IT Administrator.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011 and 2012 and the related statistics (regularly updated), and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts). To do so, you can use this form.

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Anonymous leaks 3500 Private Docs From Italian Police

October 25, 2012 Leave a comment

On the wake of similar operations carried on by Hacktivists against Law Enforcement Agencies all over the World, the Italian Cell of the infamous collective Anonymous has decided to cross the line targeting the Italian Police with a clamorous Cyber Attack under the label of #Antisec movement.

On October, the 23rd, the Hactkivists have leaked more than 3500 private documents, claiming to own an additional huge amount of sensitive information such as lawful interception schemes, private files and e-mail accounts.

The Italian Police has indirectly confirmed the attack, downplaying its effects with a scant statement (in Italian) that (easily predictable) has raised a furious reaction by the Hacktivists. According to the above mentioned statement, no server was compromised, but the leaked data were just the consequence of several “illegitimate accesses” to private emails belonging to police officers (as to say that several compromised accounts are less severe than a hacked server).

Strictly speaking, this latest attack is not a surprise since in the past months, mainly after the infamous 50 days of Lulz of the LulzSec collective, Governments and Law Enforcement Agencies all over the world have become the preferred targets for Hacktivists under the Antisec shield. From a broader perspective this trend was apparently decreasing during 2012 because of several factors: the discovery of the double identity of Sabu (an hacktivist during the day and an FBI informant during the night), the arrest of W0rmer and ItsKahuna (two members of the CabinCr3w collective who left behind them a long trail of cyber-attacks against law enforcement agencies, and, last but not least, the arrest of the members of the Team Poison Collective.

Unfortunately This cyber-attack changes the rules and brings the things back in time to Summer 2011. It looks similar to LulzSec’s Operation Chinga La Migra, targeting Arizona Border Patrol, and to another (nearly contemporary) cyber attack that allowed LulzSecBrasil (??) to leak 8 Gb of data from the Brazilian Police.

Hopefully this cyber-attack will change the rules in Italy, it has dramatically demonstrated the real risk for public institutions and the need for a greater level of security. As a consequence it cannot be absolutely underestimated.

1-15 September 2012 Cyber Attacks Timeline

September 19, 2012 Leave a comment

Here it is the usual compilation for the Cyber Attacks in the first half of September, a period which has apparently confirmed the revamping of hacktivism seen in August.

Several operations such as #OpFreeAssange (in support of Julian Assange), #OpTPB2 against the arrest of The Pirate Bay Co-Founder Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, and #OpIndipendencia in Mexico have characterized the first half of September. Curiously the hacktivists have also characterized this period for a couple of controversial events: the alleged leak of 1 million of UDIDs from FBI (later proven to be fake) and the alleged attack to GoDaddy (later proven to be a network issue, that is the reason why I not even mentioned it in this timeline). Other actions motivated by hacktivists have been carried on by Pro-Syrian hackers.

From a Cyber Crime perspective, there are two events particularly interesting (even if well different): the alleged leak of Mitt Romney’s tax returns and yet another breach against a Bitcoin Exchange (Bitfloor), worthing the equivalent of 250,000 USD which forced the operator to suspend the operations.

If you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011 and 2012 and the related statistics (regularly updated), and follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

Also, feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

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Antisec Steals 12M Apple Device IDs from FBI (Exploiting a Java Vulnerability) UPDATED

September 4, 2012 Leave a comment

Update 4 Sep 23:38 GMT+2: The FBI issued a tweet denying that it ever had the 12 million Apple IDs in question:

Here the complete Statement from the FBI Press Office.

Original Post: Few hours ago, the @AnonymousIRC Twitter account has announced yet another resounding cyber attack carried on in name of the #Antisec movement:

In a special edition of their #FFF refrain (literally quoting the authors of the attack: “so special that’s even not on friday”), the Hacktivists claim to have obtained from FBI 12,000,000 Apple Devices UDIDs (UDID is the short form for Unique Device Identifier, the unique string of numbers that univocally identifies each iOS device), and have consequently published 1,000,001 of them in pastebin post.

In the same post they explain how they were able to obtain them:

During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team was breached using the AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability on Java, during the shell session some files were downloaded from his Desktop folder one of them with the name of “NCFTA_iOS_devices_intel.csv” turned to be a list of 12,367,232 Apple iOS devices including Unique Device Identifiers (UDID), user names, name of device, type of device, Apple Push Notification Service tokens, zipcodes, cellphone numbers, addresses, etc. the personal details fields referring to people appears many times empty leaving the whole list incompleted on many parts. no other file on the same folder makes mention about this list or its purpose.

Did you notice the misplaced detail? Actually I could not help but notice that the UDIDs were obtained exploiting a Java vulnerability, the AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability (CVE-2012-0507). A detail is not so important in other circumstances, if it had not disclosed only few days after the controversies following the discovery of a potentially devastating 0-day for Java, and the subsequent issues deriving from the release of a vulnerable patch.

There could be no worse moment for this event to happen, and I am afraid it will contribute to add fuel to the raising concerns regarding Java security… Hard days for Java… And for the FBI

Imperfect Cybercrimes

April 19, 2012 1 comment

Law Enforcement Agencies are taking their revenge against the Hacktivists who mostly targeted them during the last months. In a deadly and unexpected sequence, the last 40 days have seen the heads of three infamous hacking crews falling under the blows of FBI and Scotland Yard.

One after the other, the key members of LulzSec, CabinCr3w and Team Poison have been arrested and in all but one case (that is the arrest of the alleged members of Team P0ison for which no details are known so far), the events have unveiled some surprises and unexpected details. Moreover, at least three arrests have been possible since the hackers left behind them a trail of mistakes which allowed the investigators to connect the dots and link their twitter accounts to their real identities.

The following table depicts the facts which may be better summarized from the Criminal Complaints which are reported below for:

As you may notice, in two cases, W0rmer and ItsKahuna, the hackers were betrayed by two familiar technologies which are commonly considered dangerous for users’ privacy and identity: social networks and mobile devices. Sabu was the one who really did a “technical mistake” by connecting to an IRC without protecting his IP address with TOR.

Interesting to say is also the different approach of FBI and Scotland Yard. Once discovered the real identities of the hackers the Feds tried to “enroll” them as informants, at least in one case (Sabu) this strategy was winning. At the opposite the Britons immediately caught the alleged culprits without giving any detail about their identity, maybe hoping the arrest could act as a deterrent for the other hackers. Apparently it looks like this latter strategy was not completely successful since the CabinCr3w survivors are threatening authorities, inviting other Blackhats to join them for the revenge.

Last but not least, I cannot help but notice the tweet below for which I remember to have been particularly impressed when I first saw it since, at that time, I considered it a too much imprudent. Consequently I was not that surprised when I saw it quoted in the Criminal Complaint.

At the end we are becoming more and more familiar with mobile phones and Social Network, so familiar to forget their level of intrusiveness and the related dangers for our privacy. As an example try to verify how many of you and your friend toggle Geo-Tagging off from their phone cameras. (Un)fortunately, it looks like not even the bad guys are immune from this.

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