About these ads

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Botnet’

What Security Vendors Said One Year Ago…

January 10, 2012 2 comments

I did not resist, so after publishing the summary of Security Predictions for 2012, I checked out what security vendors predicted one year ago for 2011. Exactly as I did in my previous post, at the beginning of 2011 I collected the security predictions in a similar post (in Italian). I also published in May an update (in English) since, during the Check Point Experience in Barcelona held in May 2011, the Israeli security firm published its predictions. Even if the latters have been published nearly at the half of 2011, for the sake of completeness, I decided to insert them as well in this year-to-year comparison.

Then, I included Symantec (for which this year I did not find any prediction), McAfee, Trend Micro, Kaspersky, Sophos and Cisco. I included Check Point in a second time and I did not include Fortinet, At that time I missed their five security predictions, which I only discovered later so I decided to provide an addendum for this post including Fortinet as well in order to provide a deeper perspective.

The security predictions for 2011 are summarized in the following chart, which reports what the vendors (with the partial above described exception of Checkpoint) expected for the past year in terms of Information Security trends.

But a strict side-by-side comparison with the 2012 information security predictions (extracted by my previous post) is more helpful and meaningful:

As you may notice mobile threats were on top even among the predictions for 2011. This prediction came easily true most of all for Android which suffered (and keeps on suffering) a huge increase in malware detection samples (even if the overall security risk remains contained). Social Media were on top as well: they have been crucial for the Wind of the Changes blown by the Arab Spring but in the same time Social Media have raised many security concerns for reputation, the so called Social Network Poisoning (who remembers Primoris Era?). Although 2011 was the year of the Anonymous, hacktvism ranked “only” at number 4, behind Advanced Persistent Threats, which however played a crucial role for information security (an APT was deployed for the infamous RSA Breach, but it was not an isolated case).

Also botnets, web threats and application vulnerabilities ranked at the top of Security predictions for last year (and came true). As far as botnets are concerned, fortunately 2011 was a very important year for their shutdown (for instance Hlux/Kelihos, Coreflood, Rustock). In several cases the botnets were taken down thanks to joint operations between private sectors and law enforcement agencies (another prediction came true). On the application side, this prediction came true most of all thanks to the Sony breach, the Liza Moon infection and the huge rate of SQLi based attacks and ASP.NET vulnerabilities. We have also assisted to an hard blow to SSL/TLS and XML Encryption.

But what is more surprising (and amusing) in my opinion is not to emphasize which predictions were correct, but rather to notice  which predictions were dramatically wrong: it looks like that, against the predictions, virtualization threats were snubbed by cybercrookers in 2011 (and nearly do not appear in 2012). But the most amusing fact is that no security vendor (among the ones analyzed) was able to predict the collapse of the Certification Authority model thanks most of all to the Comodo and Diginotar Breaches.

About these ads

December 2011 Cyber Attacks Timeline (Part I)

December 21, 2011 Leave a comment

As usual, here it is my compilation of December Cyber Attacks.

It looks like that Christmas approaching is not stopping hackers who targeted a growing number of  organizations including several security firms (Kaspersky, Nod 32 and Bitdefender) even if in secondary domains and with “simple” defacements.

Cyber chronicles report of Gemnet, another Certification Authority Breached in Holland (is the 12th security incident targeting CAs in 2011) and several massive data breaches targeting Finland (the fifth this year, affecting 16,000 users), online gambling (UB.com affecting 3.5 million of users),  Telco (Telstra, affecting 70,000 users), and gaming, after the well known attacks to Sony, Sega and Nintendo, with Square Enix, which suffered a huge attacks compromising 1,800,000 users (even if it looks like no personal data were affected).

Online Payment services were also targeted by Cybercrookers: a Visa East European processor has been hit by a security breach, but also four Romanian home made hackers have been arrested for a massive credit card fraud affecting 200 restaurants for a total of 80,000 customers who had their data stolen.

As usual, hacktivism was one of the main trends for this first half of the month, which started with a resounding hacking to a Web Server belonging to ACNUR (United Nations Refugees Agency) leaking more than 200 credentials including the one belonging to President Mr. Barack Obama.

But from a mere hactvism perspective, Elections in Russia have been the main trigger as they indirectly generated several cyber events: not only during the election day, in which three web sites (a watchdog and two independent news agencies) were taken down by DDoS attacks, but also in the immediately following days, when a botnet flooded Twitter with Pro Kremlin hashtags, and an independent forum was also taken down by a further DDoS attacks. A trail of events which set a very dangerous precent.

Besides the ACNUR Hack, the Anonymous were also in the spotlight (a quite common occurrence this year) with some sparse attacks targeting several governments including in particular Brazil, inside what is called #OpAmazonia.

Even if not confirmed, it looks like that Anonymous Finland might somehow be related to the above mentioned breach occurred in Finland.

Other interesting events occurred in the first two weeks of December: the 0-day vulnerability affecting Adobe products, immediately exploited by hackers to carry on tailored phishing campaigns and most of hall, a targeted attack to a contractor, Lockheed Martin, but also another occurrence of DNS Cache Poisoning targeting the Republic of Congo domains of Google, Microsoft, Samsung and others.

Last but not least, the controversial GPS Spoofing, which allegedly allowed Iran to capture a U.S. Drone, even the GPS Spoofing on its own does not completely solve the mistery of the capture.

Other victims of the month include Norwich Airport, Coca Cola, and another Law Enforcement Agency (clearusa.org), which is currently unaivalable.

As usual after the page break you find all the references.

Read more…

Categories: Cyber Attacks Timeline, Cyberwar, Security Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

One Year Of Android Malware (Full List)

August 11, 2011 30 comments

Update August 14: After the list (and the subsequent turmoil) here is the Look Inside a Year Of Android Malware.

So here it is the full list of Android Malware in a very dangerous year, since August, the 9th 2011 up-to-today.

My birthday gift for the Android is complete: exactly One year ago (9 August 2010) Kaspersky discovered the first SMS Trojan for Android in the Wild dubbed SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.a. This is considered a special date for the Google Mobile OS, since, before then, Android Malware was a litte bit more than en exercise of Style, essentially focused on Spyware. After that everything changed, and mobile malware targeting the Android OS become more and more sophisticated.

Scroll down my special compilation showing the long malware trail which characterized this hard days for information security. Commenting the graph, in my opinion, probably the turning point was Android.Geinimi (end of 2010), featuring the characteristics of a primordial Botnet, but also Android.DroidDream (AKA RootCager) is worthwhile to mention because of its capability to root the phone and potentially to remotely install applications without direct user intervention.

As you will notice, the average impact is low, but, the number of malware is growing exponentially reaching a huge peak in July.

Let’s go in this mobile malware travel between botnets, sleepwalkers, biblic plagues and call Hijackers, and meanwhile do not forget to read my presentation on how to implement a secure mobile strategy.

Date Description Features Overall Risk
Aug 9 2010
SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.a

First SMS Android Malware In the Wild: The malicious program penetrates Android devices in the guise of a harmless media player application. Once manually installed on the phone, the Trojan uses the system to begin sending SMSs to premium rate numbers without the owner’s knowledge or consent, resulting in money passing from a user’s account to that of the cybercriminals.

Aug 17 2010 AndroidOS_Droisnake.A

This is the first GPS Spy Malware disguised as an Android Snake game application. To the victim, Tap Snake looks like a clone of the Snake game. However, once someone installs this app on a phone, the “game” serves as a front for a spy app that proceeds to run in the background, secretly reporting GPS coordinates back to a server. The would-be spy then pays for and downloads an app called GPS Spy and enters an email address and code to gain access to the victim’s uploaded data.

Android MarketGPS Spy
Sep 14 2010 SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.b

Pornography lands on Android! This malware is a variant of SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.A. The malware poses as a pornographic application whose package name is pornoplayer.apk, and it installs on the phone with a pornographic icon. When the user launches the application, the malware does not show any adult content and, instead, sends 4 SMS messages to short codes, at the end-user’s expense.

Oct 13 2010
SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.c

Pornography back on Android! Third variant of the malware SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.A. New pornographic application, old icon. Sends 2 SMS messages to short codes, at the end-user’s expense.

Dec 29 2010
Android.Geinimi

First example of a Botnet-Like Malware on Android. “Grafted” onto repackaged versions of legitimate applications, primarily games, and distributed in third-party Chinese Android app markets. Once the malware is installed on a user’s phone, it has the potential to receive commands from a remote server that allow the owner of that server to control the phone. The specific information it collects includes location coordinates and unique identifiers for the device (IMEI) and SIM card (IMSI).

Botnet Like Features
Feb 14 2011
Android.Adrd AKA Android.HongTouTou

New Malware with Botnet-like Features from China. The trojan compromises personal data such as IMEI/IMSI of the device and sends them back to the remote side to react based on the commands from there. Similar to Android.Geinimi but with a lower profile (less commands)

Botnet Like Features
Feb 22 2011 Android.Pjapps

New Trojan horse embedded on third party applications. It opens a back door on the compromised device and retrieves commands from a remote command and control server.

Botnet Like Features
Mar 1 2011 Android.DroidDream AKA Android.Rootcager AKA AndroidOS_Lootoor.A

The first example of a new generation of Mobile Malware: distributed through the Official Android Market, affected, according to Symantec 50,000 to 200,000 users. Expoits two different tools (rageagainstthecage and exploid) to root the phone

Android MarketBotnet Like FeaturesRoot

Mar 9 2011 Android.BgServ AKA Troj/Bgserv-A AKA AndroidOS_BGSERV.A

Trojanized version of the Android Market Security tool released by Google, on March the 6th, to remove the effects of DroidDream. The trojan opens a back door and transmits information from the device to a remote location. It shows more than ever security and reputation flaws in the Android Market Proposition Model. 5,000 users affected.

Android MarketBotnet Like FeaturesRoot

Mar 20 2011 Android.Zeahache

Trojan horse that elevates privileges on the compromised device, discovered on a Chinese language app available for download on alternative Chinese app markets. The app has the ability to root an Android device (by mean of the exploid tool called by zHash binary), leaving the device vulnerable to future threats. The app, which provides calling plan management capabilities was found also on the Android Market albeit this version lacked the code to invoke the exploit.

Android MarketRoot

Mar 30 2011 Android.Walkinwat

Manually installed from non-official Android Markets, the Trojan modifies certain permissions on the compromised device that allow it to perform the following actions: Access contacts in the address book, ccess network information, access the phone in a read-only state, access the vibrator on the phone, Check the license server for the application, find the phone’s location, initiate a phone call without using the interface, open network sockets to access the Internet, read low-level log files, send SMS messages, turn the phone on and off. It gives a message to user trying to discipline users that download files illegally from unauthorized sites.

May 9 2011

Android.Adsms AKA AndroidOS_Adsms.A

This malware specifically targeted China Mobile subscribers. The malware arrived through a link sent through SMS. The said message tells the China Mobile users to install a patch for their supposedly vulnerable devices by accessing the given link, which actually leads to a malicious configuration file. The malware then send message to premium numbers.

Android Market

May 11 2011

Android.Zsone AKA Android.Smstibook

Google removed a Trojan, Zsone, from the Android Market with the ability to subscribe users in China to premium rate QQ codes via SMS without their knowledge. 10,000 users affected.

Android Market

May 22 2011

Android.Spacem

A biblical plague For Android! Trojanized version of a legitimate application that is part threat, part doomsayer. The threat was embedded in a pirated version of an app called ‘Holy ***king Bible’, which itself has stirred controversy on multiple forums in which the app is in circulation. The malware targeted North American Users. After the reboot, it starts a service whichm at regular intervals, attempts to contact a host service, passing along the device’s phone number and operator code. It then attempts to retrieve a command from a remote location in intervals of 33 minutes. In addition to having abilities to respond to commands through the Internet and SMS, the threat also has activities that are designed to trigger on the 21 and 22 of May 2011, respectively (The End of The World).

Android Market

Botnet Like Features

May 31 2011

Android.LightDD

A brand new version of Android.DroidDream, dubbed DroidDreamLight, was found in 24 additional apps repackaged and redistributed with the malicious payload across a total of 5 different developers distributed in the Android Market. Between 30.000 and 120.000 users affected.

Android Market

Botnet Like Features

Jun 6 2011

Android/DroidKungFu.A AKA Android.Gunfu

Malware which uses the same exploit than DroidDream, rageagainstthecage, to gain root privilege and install the main malware component. Once installed, the malware has backdoor capabilities and is able to: execute command to delete a supplied file, execute a command to open a supplied homepage, download and install a supplied APK, open a supplied URL, run or start a supplied application package. The malware is moreover capable to obtain some information concerning the device and send them to a remote server: The collected information include: IMEI number, Build version release, SDK version, users’ mobile number, Phone model, Network Operator, Type of Net Connectivity, SD card available memory, Phone available memory. In few words, the device is turned into a member of a botnet.

Root

Botnet Like Features

Jun 9 2011

Android.Basebridge

Trojan Horse that attempts to send premium-rate SMS messages to predetermined numbers. When an infected application is installed, it attempts to exploit the udev Netlink Message Validation Local Privilege Escalation Vulnerability (BID 34536) in order to obtain “root” privileges.  Once running with “root” privileges it installs an executable which contains functionality to communicate with a control server using HTTP protocol and sends information such as Subscriber ID, Manufacturer and Model of the device, Version of the Android operating system. The Trojan also periodically connects to the control server and may perform the following actions: send SMS messages, remove SMS messages from the Inbox and dial phone numbers. The Trojan also contains functionality to monitor phone usage.

Botnet Like Features

Jun 9 2011

Android.Uxipp AKA Android/YZHCSMS.A

Trojan Horse that attempts to send premium-rate SMS messages to predetermined numbers. Again the threat is as an application for a Chinese gaming community. When executed, the Trojan attempts to send premium-rate SMS messages to several numbers and remove the SMS sent.
The Trojan sends device information, such as IMEI and IMSI numbers.

Android Market

Jun 10 2011

Andr/Plankton-A AKA Android.Tonclank 

This is a Trojan horse which steals information and may open a back door on Android devices. Available for download in the Android Market embedded in several applications, when the Trojan is executed, it steals the following information from the device: Device ID and Device permissions. The above information is then sent to a remote server from which  the Trojan downloads a .jar file which opens a back door and accepts commands to perform the following actions on the compromised device: copies all of the bookmarks on the device, copies all of the history on the device, copies all of the shortcuts on the device, creates a log of all of the activities performed on the device, modifies the browser’s home page, returns the status of the last executed command. The gathered information is then sent to a remote location.

Although this malware does not root the phone, its approach of loading additional code does not allow security software on Android to inspect the downloaded file in the usual “on-access” fashion, but only through scheduled and “on-demand” scans. This is the reason why the malware was not discovered before.

Android Market

Botnet Like Features

Jun 15 2011

Android.Jsmshider

Trojan found in alternative Android markets that predominately target Chinese Android users. This Trojan predominantly affects devices with a custom ROM. The application masquerades as a legitimate one and exploits a vulnerability found in the way most custom ROMs sign their system images to install a secondary payload (without user permission) onto the ROM, giving it the ability to communicate with a remote server and receive commands. Once installed the second payload may read, send and process incoming SMS messages (potentially for mTAN interception or fraudulent premium billing subscriptions), install apps trasparently, communicate with a remote server using DES encryption.

Botnet Like Features

Jun 20 2011

Android.GGTracker

This trojan is automatically downloaded to a user’s phone after visiting a malicious webpage that imitates the Android Market. The Trojan, which targets users in the United States by interacting with a number of premium SMS subscription services without consent, is able to sign-up a victim to a number of premium SMS subscription services without the user’s consent.  This can lead to unapproved charges to a victim’s phone bill. Android users are directed to install this Trojan after clicking on a malicious in-app advertisement, for instance a Fake Battery Saver.

Jul 1 2011

Android.KungFu Variants

Repackaged and distributed in the form of “legitimate” applications, these two variants are different from the original one by  re-implementing some of their malicious functionalities in native code and supporting two additional command and control (C&C) domains. The changes are possibly in place to make their detection and analysis harder.

The repackaged apps infected with the DroidKungFu variants are made available through a number of alternative app markets and forums targeting Chinese-speaking users.

RootBotnet Like Features
Jul 3 2011 AndroidOS_Crusewin.A AKA Android.Crusewind

Another example of a trojan which sends SMS to premium rate numbers. It also acts as a SMS Relay. It displays a standard Flash icon in the application list. The Trojan attempts to download an XML configuration file and uses it to retrieve a list of further URLs to send and receive additional data. The Trojan also contains functionality to perform the following actions: delete itself, delete SMS messages, send premium-rate SMS messages to the number that is specified in the downloaded XML configuration file, update itself.

Jul 6 2011

AndroidOS_SpyGold.A AKA Android.GoldDream

This backdoor is a Trojanized copy of a legitimate gaming application for Android OS smartphones. It steals sensitive information of the affected phone’s SMS and calls functions, compromising the security of the device and of the user. It monitors the affected phone’s SMS and phone calls and sends stolen information to a remote URL. It also connects to a malicious URL in order to receive commands from a remote malicious user.

Botnet Like Features

Jul 8 2011 DroidDream Light Variant

New variant of DroidDream Light in the Android Market, immediately removed by Google. Number of downloads was limited to 1000 – 5000. This is the third iteration of malware likely created by the authors of DroidDream.

Android Market

Botnet Like Features

Jul 11 2011

Android.Smssniffer AKA Andr/SMSRep-B/C AKA Android.Trojan.SmsSpy.B/C AKA Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Smser.a


ZiTMO arrives on Android!
This threat is found bundled with repackaged versions of legitimate applications. When the Trojan is executed, it grabs a copy of all SMS messages received on the handheld device and sends them to a remote location.

Jul 12 2011

Android.HippoSMS AKA Android.Hippo

Another threat found bundled with repackaged versions of legitimate applications. When the Trojan is executed, it grabs a copy of all SMS messages received on the handheld device and sends them to a remote location.

Jul 15 2011

Android.Fokonge

This threat is often found bundled with repackaged versions of legitimate applications. The repackaged applications are typically found on unofficial websites offering Android applications. When the Trojan is executed, it steals information and sends it to a remote server.

Botnet Like Features

Jul 15 2011

Android/Sndapps.A AKA Android.Snadapps

Five Android Apps found in the official Android Market share a common suspicious payload which upload users’ personal information such as email accounts as well as phone numbers to a remote server without user’s awareness.

Android Market

Botnet Like Features

Jul 27 2011

Android.Nickispy

Trojan horse which steals several information from Android devices (for instance GPS Location or Wi-Fi position). For the first time on the Android Platform a malware is believed  to spy conversations.

Botnet Like Features

Jul 28 2011

Android.Lovetrap

Trojan horse that sends SMS messages to premium-rate phone number. When the Trojan is executed, it retrieves information containing premium-rate phone numbers from a malicious URL then sends premium-rate SMS messages. and attempts to block any confirmation SMS messages the compromised device may receive from the premium-rate number in an attempt to mask its activities. The Trojan also attempts to gather IMSI and location information and send the information to the remote attacker.

Aug2 2011

Android.Premiumtext

This is a detection for Trojan horses that send SMS texts to premium-rate numbers. These Trojan is a repackaged versions of genuine Android software packages, often distributed outside the Android Marketplace. The package name, publisher, and other details will vary and may be taken directly from the original application..

Aug 9 2011

Android.NickiBot

It belongs to the same NickiSpy family. However, it is significantly different from its predecessor since it is fully controlled by SMS messages instead of relying on a hard-coded C&C server for instructions. In addition, NickiBot supports a range of bot commands, such as for (GPS-based) location monitoring, sound recording and (email-based) uploading, calllog collection, etc. It also has a check-in mechanism to a remote website. his threat is often found bundled with repackaged versions of legitimate applications. The repackaged applications are typically found on unofficial websites offering Android applications. When the Trojan is executed, it steals information and sends it to a remote server.

Botnet Like Features

Legend

Parallel Market

Android MarketAndroid Market

Manual Install

Automatic Install of Apps

Send SMS or Calls to Premium Numbers

Botnet Like Features Server C&C

GPS SpyGPS Spyware

Root Root Access

Happy Birthday! One Year of Android Malware

August 9, 2011 2 comments

Exactly One year ago (9 August 2010) Kaspersky discovered the first SMS Trojan for Android in the Wild dubbed SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.a. This is considered a special date for the Google Mobile OS, since, before then, Android Malware was a litte bit more than en exercise of Style, essentially focused on Spyware. After that everything changed, and mobile malware targeting the Android OS become more and more sophisticated.

For this reason I decided to prepare a special birthday gift for the Android, that is a special compilation showing the long malware trail which characterized this day. Commenting the graph, in my opinion, probably the turning point was Android.Geinimi (end of 2010), featuring the characteristics of a primordial Botnet, but also Android.DroidDream (AKA RootCager) is worthwhile to mention because of its capability to root the phone and potentially to remotely install applications without direct user intervention. Moreover, as you will have probably noticed, the average impact is low, but, the number of malware is growing exponentially after June, this is the reason why I decided to divide my special compilation in two parts. Today is part I: from the beginning to May, the 31st 2011.

Let’s go in this mobile malware travel between botnets, sleepwalkers and biblic plagues and meanwhile do not forget to read my presentation on how to implement a secure mobile strategy.

Date Description Features Overall Risk
Aug 9 2010
SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.a

First SMS Android Malware In the Wild: The malicious program penetrates Android devices in the guise of a harmless media player application. Once manually installed on the phone, the Trojan uses the system to begin sending SMSs to premium rate numbers without the owner’s knowledge or consent, resulting in money passing from a user’s account to that of the cybercriminals.

Aug 17 2010 AndroidOS_Droisnake.A

This is the first GPS Spy Malware disguised as an Android Snake game application. To the victim, Tap Snake looks like a clone of the Snake game. However, once someone installs this app on a phone, the “game” serves as a front for a spy app that proceeds to run in the background, secretly reporting GPS coordinates back to a server. The would-be spy then pays for and downloads an app called GPS Spy and enters an email address and code to gain access to the victim’s uploaded data.

Android MarketGPS Spy
Sep 14 2010 SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.b

Pornography lands on Android! This malware is a variant of SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.A. The malware poses as a pornographic application whose package name is pornoplayer.apk, and it installs on the phone with a pornographic icon. When the user launches the application, the malware does not show any adult content and, instead, sends 4 SMS messages to short codes, at the end-user’s expense.

Oct 13 2010
SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.c

Pornography back on Android! Third variant of the malware SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.A. New pornographic application, old icon. Sends 2 SMS messages to short codes, at the end-user’s expense.

Dec 29 2010
Android.Geinimi

First example of a Botnet-Like Malware on Android. “Grafted” onto repackaged versions of legitimate applications, primarily games, and distributed in third-party Chinese Android app markets. Once the malware is installed on a user’s phone, it has the potential to receive commands from a remote server that allow the owner of that server to control the phone. The specific information it collects includes location coordinates and unique identifiers for the device (IMEI) and SIM card (IMSI).

Botnet Like Features
Feb 14 2011
Android.Adrd AKA Android.HongTouTou

New Malware with Botnet-like Features from China. The trojan compromises personal data such as IMEI/IMSI of the device and sends them back to the remote side to react  based on the commands from there. Similar to Android.Geinimi but with a lower profile (less commands)

Botnet Like Features
Feb 22 2011 Android.Pjapps

New Trojan horse embedded on third party applications. It opens a back door on the compromised device and retrieves commands from a remote command and control server.

Botnet Like Features
Mar 1 2011 Android.DroidDream AKA Android.Rootcager AKA AndroidOS_Lootoor.A

The first example of a new generation of Mobile Malware: distributed through the Official Android Market, affected, according to Symantec 50,000 to 200,000 users. Expoits two different tools  (rageagainstthecage and exploid) to root the phone

Android MarketBotnet Like FeaturesRoot

Mar 9 2011 Android.BgServ AKA Troj/Bgserv-A AKA AndroidOS_BGSERV.A

Trojanized version of the Android Market Security tool released by Google, on March the 6th, to remove the effects of DroidDream. The trojan opens a back door and transmits information from the device to a remote location. It shows more than ever security and reputation flaws in the Android Market Proposition Model. 5,000 users affected.

Android MarketBotnet Like FeaturesRoot

Mar 20 2011 Android.Zeahache

Trojan horse that elevates privileges on the compromised device, discovered on a Chinese language app available for download on alternative Chinese app markets. The app has the ability to root an Android device (by mean of the exploid tool called by zHash binary), leaving the device vulnerable to future threats. The app, which provides calling plan management capabilities was found also on the Android Market albeit this version lacked the code to invoke the exploit.

Android MarketRoot

Mar 30 2011 Android.Walkinwat

Manually installed from non-official Android Markets, the Trojan modifies certain permissions on the compromised device that allow it to perform the following actions: Access contacts in the address book, ccess network information, access the phone in a read-only state, access the vibrator on the phone, Check the license server for the application, find the phone’s location, initiate a phone call without using the interface, open network sockets to access the Internet, read low-level log files, send SMS messages, turn the phone on and off. It gives a message to user  trying to discipline users that download files illegally from unauthorized sites.

May 9 2011

Android.Adsms AKA AndroidOS_Adsms.A

This malware specifically targeted China Mobile subscribers. The malware arrived through a link sent through SMS. The said message tells the China Mobile users to install a patch for their supposedly vulnerable devices by accessing the given link, which actually leads to a malicious configuration file. The malware then send message to premium numbers.

Android Market

May 11 2011

Android.Zsone AKA Android.Smstibook

Google removed a Trojan, Zsone, from the Android Market with the ability to subscribe users in China to premium rate QQ codes via SMS without their knowledge. 10,000 users affected.

Android Market

May 22 2011

Android.Spacem

A biblical plague For Android! Trojanized version of a legitimate application that is part threat, part doomsayer. The threat was embedded in a pirated version of an app called ‘Holy ***king Bible’, which itself has stirred controversy on multiple forums in which the app is in circulation. The malware targeted North American Users. After the reboot, it starts a service whichm at regular intervals, attempts to contact a host service, passing along the device’s phone number and operator code. It then attempts to retrieve a command from a remote location in intervals of 33 minutes. In addition to having abilities to respond to commands through the Internet and SMS, the threat also has activities that are designed to trigger on the 21 and 22 of May 2011, respectively (The End of The World).

Android Market

Botnet Like Features

May 31 2011

Android.LightDD

A brand new version of Android.DroidDream, dubbed DroidDreamLight, was found in 24 additional apps repackaged and redistributed with the malicious payload across a total of 5 different developers distributed in the Android Market. Between 30.000 and 120.000 users affected.

Android Market

Botnet Like Features

Legend

Parallel Market

Android MarketAndroid Market

Manual Install

Automatic Install of Apps

Send SMS or Calls to Premium Numbers

Botnet Like Features Server C&C

GPS SpyGPS Spyware

Mobile Security: Impressioni a Caldo

March 16, 2011 4 comments

Fortunatamente il virus che mi ha colpito sta mitigando i suoi effetti, la mente è un po’ più lucida e quindi mi permette di raccogliere le idee e tirare le somme sulla tavola rotonda del 14 marzo.

In effetti è stata una occasione propizia per confrontarsi con la prospettiva degli operatori e valutare come gli stessi intendano affrontare il problema della sicurezza mobile considerato il fatto che esso è si un problema tecnologico, ma interessa principalmente l’utente: parafrasando una felice espressione emersa durante la tavola rotonda, espressione tanto cara agli operatori, si può affermare che il problema della mobile security arriva “all’ultimo miglio”, ovvero sino a casa (in questo caso virtuale) dell’utente stesso.

Ad ogni modo su un punto gli addetti del settore, operatori inclusi, sono tutti d’accordo: sebbene il problema della sicurezza mobile parta da lontano, ovvero dal processo di Consumerization dell’IT che ha “prestato” al mondo Enterprise strumenti di lavoro non nativamente concepiti per un uso professionale; il ruolo principale, in termini di sicurezza, rimane quello dell’utente. Gli utenti hanno eccessiva familiarità con i dispositivi, dimenticano che sono a tutti gli effetti ormai vere e proprie estensioni del proprio ufficio, e questo li porta a comportamenti superficiali, quali ad esempio l’utilizzo di pratiche di root o jailbreak, l’utilizzo di Market paralleli e la mancata abitudine di controllare i permessi delle applicazioni durante l’installazione.

Naturalmente questo ha conseguenze molto nefaste poiché le minacce che interessano il mondo mobile sono molteplici e peggiorate dal fatto che oramai, con i nuovi dispositivi acquistati nel 2011 ci porteremo almeno 2 core nel taschino. Prendete le minacce che interessano i dispositivi fissi, unitele al fatto che il dispositivo mobile lo avete sempre dietro e lo utilizzate per qualsiasi cosa ed ecco che il quadro si riempe di frodi, furto di informazioni (di qualsiasi tipo visto l’utilizzo corrente dei dispositivi), malware, spam, Denial of Service, e non ultima, la possibilità di creare Botnet comandate da remoto per effettuare DDoS, SMS spam, rubare dati su vasta scala.

Sebbene il punto di arrivo sia lo stesso (ovvero la necessità di una maggiore consapevolezza da parte dell’utente), le opinioni sul ruolo del processo di Consumerization non sono omogenee tra chi, come il sottoscritto, ritiene che le tecnologie non abbiano i necessari livelli di sicurezza richiesti per un uso professionale (e questo fattore è peggiorato dall’atteggiamento dell’utente) e chi sostiene invece che le tecnologie sono intrinsecamente sicure ma il problema è in ogni caso riconducibile all’utente che si rivolge, lui stesso, ai dispositivi, anche per uso professionale, con un atteggiamento consumer.

Riguardo gli aspetti relativi a tecnologia e mercato la mia opinione è molto chiara: i due punti sono intrinsecamente connessi  e questo si traduce, sinteticamente, nella necessità di portare nel mondo mobile le stesse tecnologie di protezione degli endpoint tradizionali. Secondo la mia personale esperienza, il mercato ha difatti iniziato il processo, che diverrà sempre più preponderante, di considerare il mondo degli endpoint mobili come una estensione naturale del mondo degli endpoint tradizionali (notebook, desktop, etc.) ai quali si dovranno pertanto applicare le stesse policy e gli stessi livelli di sicurezza (con le opportune differenziazioni dovute alla diversa natura dei dispositivi) proprie del mondo wired. Fondamentale in questo scenario è il modello di gestione unificata endpoint fissi e mobili in grado di applicare in modo astratto e device indipendent le stesse politiche di sicurezza a tutti i dispositivi indipendentemente dalla natura degli stessi.

Per quanto concerne la tecnologia, (pre)vedo due filoni protagonisti del mondo mobile: il DLP e la Virtualizzazione. Il DLP poiché ritengo il modello di sicurezza mobile perfettibile, e di conseguenza lo ritengo terreno fertile per i produttori di sicurezza in grado di ampliare, con le proprie soluzioni, il modello di sicurezza nativo (con qualche riserva su Apple vista la poca apertura di Cupertino); la Virtualizzazione, di cui ho già avuto modo di parlare, consentirà di risolvere i problemi di tecnologia e privacy connessi con l’utilizzo professionale del proprio dispositivo. Grazie alla virtualizzazione, di cui dovremmo vedere i primi esempi nella seconda metà di quest’anno, una Organizzazione potrà gestire il proprio telefono virtuale all’interno del dispositivo fisico dell’utente, controllando le policy e le applicazioni e tenendo i due mondi completamente separati. Questa soluzione dovrebbe essere una ottima spinta per risolvere i problemi tecnologici e di privacy (non dimentichiamoci infatti che spesso l’utente finisce inevitabilmente per inserire informazioni personali anche nel dispositivo professionale), delegando, almeno per la macchina virtuale enterprise, il modello di sicurezza dall’utente all’Organizzazione.

Infine si arriva, inevitabilmente alla domanda fatale: la sicurezza ha un costo: chi paga? A mio avviso il modello è (relativamente) semplice e, personalissima opinione, è sufficiente voltarsi indietro per capire come potrà essere il modello di sicurezza futuro.

Naturalmente la distinzione tra consumer ed enterprise è d’obbligo: per quanto ho affermato in precedenza le organizzazioni, soprattutto se di una certa dimensione, saranno autonome nella realizzazione (e di conseguenza nel sostenerne i costi) della propria architettura di sicurezza mobile concependola come una estensione trasparente del modello di sicurezza per gli endpoint tradizionali. Questa è la tendenza verso cui sta andando il mercato e verso la quale stanno convergendo i produttori con l’offerta di suite di sicurezza complete per sistemi operativi fissi e mobili contraddistinte da modelli di gestione unificata.

Diverso è il caso del mondo consumer ma anche in questo caso prevedo che, implicitamente, i terminali mobili verranno trattati alla stregua di terminali fissi e quindi le funzioni di sicurezza potranno essere offerte, ad esempio, come un add-on del piano dati, analogamente a quanto accade oggi per l’antivirus/personal firewall, che ormai tutti gli operatori offrono in bundle con la connessione ad Internet. In questo caso è importante notare anche il fatto che l’età media degli utilizzatori è sempre più bassa pertanto, soprattutto nel mondo consumer, gli stessi mostreranno sempre maggiore familiarità con le tecnologie mobili e le loro necessarie estensioni in ambito di sicurezza al punto di considerarle tutt’uno.

Rimane ovviamente ancora da verificare l’aspetto relativo ad eventuali investimenti infrastrutturali: una interessante domanda rivolta agli operatori ha infatti evidenziato se vi è allo studio la creazione di una baseline (ovvero l’analisi dei livelli di traffico per evidenziare anomalie dovute, ad esempio, ad eccessivo traffico generato da malware). Allo stato attuale, essendo il problema trasversale tra tecnologie e legge, la baseline è dettata dalla stessa compliance.

Se L’Androide Evapora

L’ultima segnalazione in fatto di malware per il povero Androide ce la segnala Symantec. E’ di queste ore la notizia della scoperta di un nuovo malware per il povero Androide senza pace. Android.Pjapps, questo il nome del malware, che si nasconde dietro una applicazione lecita: Steamy Window che nella sua versione pulita, vaporizza lo schermo dell’Androide, e nella versione bacata ne vaporizza anche la sicurezza.

Anche in questo caso siamo alle solite: permessi sospetti durante l’installazione, e mentre l’utente gioca a pulire lo schermo con il ditino, il trojan imprigiona l’Androide dentro una botnet controllata da alcuni server di Comando e Controllo (C&C). Una volta infettato l’Androide Impazzito è in grado di installare applicazioni contro la volontà dell’utente, navigare verso siti web, aggiungere bookmark al browser, inviare messaggi di testo e anche, bloccare le risposte a messaggi.

Il tutto, come nelle migliori tradizioni, rigorosamente in background senza che l’utente se ne accorga minimamente. Ad un cambiamento dell’intensità del segnale il servizio si avvia e tenta di connettersi al seguente server di comando e controllo:

http://mobile.meego91.com/mm.do?.. (parametri di controllo)

Come si nota agli autori del malware non è mancato il sense of humor, visto che a controllare i dispositivi è un server che richiama meego, il (quasi) defunto sistema operativo figlio della scellerata alleanza tra Nokia e Intel.

Assieme al Check-In, il malware invia informazioni sensibili ottenute dal dispositivo, tra cui:

Alla risposta invia un messaggio con l’IMEI del dispositivo compromesso ad un numero ottenuto dall’indirizzo seguente:

http://log.meego91.com:9033/android.log?(parametri di controllo)

Anche in questo caso c’è un richiamo al povero MeeGo. Ovviamente il numero a cui viene inviato il messaggio è controllato dall’attaccante che è in grado di nascondere la sua identità.

Di tanto in tanto, inoltre, il servizio malevolo, mediante un proprio protocollo basato su XML, controlla il server di Comando e Controllo per verificare se ci sono altri comandi.

http://xml.meego91.com:8118/push/newandroidxml/...(comandi).

Anche in questo caso il problema è sempre lo stesso, una applicazione apparentemente lecita presa da un market parallelo e con permessi di installazione improbabili. Manca solo il terzo aspetto che sino ad oggi ha contraddistinto tutti i malware per il povero Androide (dopo i casi di Geinimi e HongTouTou), ovvero la Cina. Forti dubbi mi sono venuti da questa illustrazione che ho trovato sul Blog Symantec, ma poi scavando nella Rete ho scoperto che nelle stesse ore una azienda di sicurezza Cinese (guarda a caso) Netquin ha scoperto due varianti (chiamate SW.SecurePhone e SW.Qieting) presumibilmente riconducibili al malware rilevato da Symantec.

Devo ammettere che il dubbio che siano proprio le aziende d’Oriente a mettere in circolazione le infezioni per l’Androide non si è ancora completamente dissolto…

Se L’Androide Gioca A RisiKo!

February 26, 2011 Leave a comment

Il video sottostante circola già in rete da qualche tempo ma non ha assolutamente perso il grip (anche se non dovrei vantarmene l’ho linkato un paio di giorni or sono sul mio profilo Facebook): i ragazzi di Android Talks hanno rappresentato graficamente le attivazioni degli Androidi a livello mondiale.

A voi il commento! Io mi limito a dire che, alla prima visione, di questo Risiko virtuale, dopo la suggestione iniziale, non ho potuto fare a meno di collegarlo con i recenti sviluppi in termini di sicurezza. A quando un video che rappresenterà la proliferazione di una botnet di Androidi o Melafonini, magari sulla scia di quanto i ricercatori Symantec hanno fatto per Stuxnet?

Lo Smartphone? Ha fatto il BOT!

February 23, 2011 2 comments

E’ stato appena pubblicato un interessante articolo di Georgia Weidman relativo al concept di una botnet di smartphone controllati tramite SMS. Il lavoro, annunciato alla fine del mese di gennaio 2011 e presentato alla Shmoocon di Washington, aveva da subito attirato la mia attenzione poiché, in tempi non sospetti, avevo ipotizzato che la concomitanza di fattori quali la crescente potenza di calcolo dei dispositivi mobili e la loro diffusione esponenziale, avrebbe presto portato alla nascita di possibili eserciti di Androidi (o Mele) controllate da remoto in grado di eseguire la volontà del proprio padrone.

Il modello di mobile bot ipotizzato (per cui è stato sviluppato un Proof-Of-Concept per diverse piattaforme) è molto raffinato e prevede il controllo dei terminali compromessi da parte di un server C&C di Comando e Controllo, mediante messaggi SMS (con una struttura di controllo gerarchica), che vengono intercettati da un livello applicativo malevolo posizionato tra il driver GSM ed il livello applicativo. La scelta degli SMS come mezzo di trasmissione (che in questo modello di controllo assurgono al ruolo di indirizzi IP) è dovuto all’esigenza di rendere quanto più possibile trasparente il meccanismo di controllo per utenti e operatori (l’alternativa sarebbe quella del controllo tramite una connessione  dati che tuttavia desterebbe presto l’attenzione dell’utente per l’aumento sospetto di consumo della batteria che non è mai troppo per gli Androidi e i Melafonini ubriaconi). Naturalmente il livello applicativo malevolo è completamente trasparente per l’utente e del tutto inerme nel processare i dati e gli SMS leciti e passarli correttamente al livello applicativo senza destare sospetti.

Georgia Weidman non ha trascurato proprio nulla e nel suo modello ipotizza una struttura gerarchica a tre livelli:

  • Il primo livello è composto dai Master Bot, controllati direttamente dagli “ammucchiatori”. I Master Bot non sono necessariamente terminali (nemmeno compromessi), ma dovendo impartire ordini via SMS possono essere dispositivi qualsiasi dotati di un Modem;
  • Il secondo livello è composto dai Sentinel Bot: questi agiscono come proxy tra i master e l’esercito di terminali compromessi. Le sentinelle devono essere dispositivi “di fiducia”, ovvero dispositivi sotto il diretto controllo degli “ammucchiatori” o membri della botnet da un periodo di tempo sufficientemente lungo da far ritenere che l’infezione sia ormai passata inosservata per il proprietario e degna pertanto di promuoverli al ruolo di sentinelle.
  • Il terzo livello è composto dagli slave bot. I veri e propri soldati dell’esercito di terminali compromessi che ricevono le istruzioni dalla sentinelle ed eseguono il volere del capo.

Da notare che questo modello gerarchico applica il paradigma del “divide et impera”. I terminali compromessi slave non comunicano mai direttamente con il master, e solo quest’ultimo, inoltre, conosce la struttura dell’intera botnet. L’utilizzo del SMS inoltre consente al master di poter cambiare numero di telefono all’occorrenza ed eludere così le forze del bene, ovvero gli eventuali cacciatori di bot.

Ovviamente tutte le comunicazioni avvengono tramite SMS cifrati (con un algoritmo di cifratura a chiave asimmetrica) e autenticati, inoltre la scoperta di un telefono infetto non pregiudica l’intera rete di terminali compromessi ma solo il segmento controllato dalla sentinella di riferimento (il master può sempre cambiare numero).

Quali possono essere gli utilizzi di una botnet così strutturata? Naturalmente rubare informazioni, per fini personali o di qualsiasi altro tipo (politici, economici, etc.). Purtroppo, per questa classe di dispositivi, che stanno trovando sempre di più applicazioni verso i livelli alti di una Organizzazione, gli exploit e i bachi sono all’ordine del giorno per cui teoricamente sarebbe possibile rubare il contenuto della memoria SD con un semplice SMS. Ma non finisce qui purtroppo: considerata la potenza di calcolo (abbiamo ormai un PC nel taschino) e la potenza di calcolo, questi dispositivi possono essere facilmente usati come seminatori di traffico, ovvero sorgenti di attacchi di tipo DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service), specialmente nel caso di connessioni Wi-Fi che si appoggiano su un operatore fisso  che offre possibilità  di banda maggiori e quindi più consone ad un attacco di tipo Distributed Denial Of Service. Questo si sposa perfettamente con la dinamicità di una botnet basata su SMS (in cui il master può cambiare numero per nascondersi) e con le infrastrutture degli operatori mobili (o fissi offerenti servizi Wi-Fi) che potrebbero non essere completamente pronte per affrontare simili tipologie di eventi informatici (come anche evidenziato dal recente report di Arbor Networks). Altra nefasta applicazione potrebbe essere lo spam, soprattutto se effettuato tramite SMS. Interessante inoltre la combinazione con il GPS che potrebbe portare al blocco totale delle comunicazioni GSM in determinate circostanze spazio-temporali (sembra fantapolitica ma è comunque teoricamente possibile).

Rimane ora l’ultimo punto che era rimasto in sospeso quando avevo trattato di questo argomento per la prima volta:  mi ero difatti chiesto la questione fondamentale, ovvero se il software malevolo di bot avesse necessità o meno di permessi di root. La risposta è affermativa, ma questo non mitiga la gravità del Proof-Of-Concept, ribadisce anzi l’importanza di un concetto fondamentale: alla base della sicurezza c’è sempre l’utente, il cui controllo sovrasta anche i meccanismi di sicurezza del sistema operativo, e questo non solo perché ancora una volta viene evidenziata drammaticamente la pericolosità di pratiche “smanettone” sui propri dispositivi (che possono avere conseguenze ancora più gravi se il terminale è usato per scopi professionali), ma anche perché gli utenti devono prendere consapevolezza del modello di sicurezza necessario, facendo attenzione alle applicazioni installate.

Lato operatori, urge l’assicurazione che gli aggiornamenti di sicurezza raggiungano sempre i dispositivi non appena rilasciati. Aggiungerei inoltre, sulla scia di quanto dichiarato da Arbor Networks, possibili investimenti infrastrutturali per l’eventuale rilevazione di eventi anomali dentro i propri confini.

A questo punto, il fatto che i produttori di sicurezza abbiano, quasi all’unanimità, inserito il mondo mobile al centro delle preoccupazioni di sicurezza per il 2011 perde qualsiasi dubbio sul fatto che si tratti di una moda passeggera, ed è asupicabile che  gli stessi stiano già correndo ai ripari, aggiungendo livelli di sicurezza aggiuntivi ai meccanismi intrinseci del sistema operativo con l’ausilio di tecnologie di DLP (come indicato dal report Cisco per il 2011), virtualizzazione e integrando sempre di più tecnologie di sicurezza nei dispositivi: ultimo annuncio in ordine di tempo? Quello di McAfee Intel che si dimostra, ancora una volta, molto attiva nel settore mobile.

Report Cisco 4Q 2010: Il Malware Web ha fatto il Bot(net)

February 20, 2011 Leave a comment

Dopo i turni di McAfee e Symantec è la volta di Cisco: il gigante dei router e della sicurezza perimetrale ha da poco pubblicato il proprio Cisco 4Q10 Global Threat Report che riflette i trend della sicurezza su scala globale da ottobre a dicembre 2010.

Il report Cisco si differenzia leggermente dai documenti precedentemente citati poiché proviene da un produttore di sicurezza focalizzato su soluzioni di rete, e si basa inoltre su dati di traffico raccolti dalla propria rete di sensori di Intrusion Prevention (IPS), di dispositivi di sicurezza IronPort per la posta e per il traffico Web, dai propri servizi di gestione remota Remote Management Services (RMS), ed infine dai porpri servizi di sicurezza basati sul Cloud ScanSafe.

Picco di Malware in Ottobre

Gli utenti Enterprise in media hanno registrato, nel periodo in esame, 135 impatti di nuovo malware al mese, con un picco di 250 eventi al mese in ottobre, mese che ha visto anche il più elevato numero di host intercettati ospitanti web malware  che si è attestato a 16.905. In totale nel periodo sono stati rilevati 38.811 eventi web risultanti, in totale, a 127.622 URL.

Il traffico correlato ai motori di ricerca si è attestato a circa l’8% del web malware con la maggior percentuale, pari al 3.84%, proeveniente da Google, in notevole calo rispetto al 7% della stessaa tipologia di traffico rilevata nel terzo quarto. Il traffico di tipo webmail si è invece attestato all’1%.

Il malware Gumblar (caratterizzato del redirigere le ricerche) ha compromesso in media il 2% delle ricerche nel periodo Q4 2010,  anche in questo caso in netto calo rispetto al picco del 17% raggiunto a maggio 2010.

Per quanto concerne gli exploit applicativi, Java l’ha fatta da padrone: la creatura di SUN Oracle ha sbaragliato la concorrenza, posizionandosi al 6.5%, una percentuale quasi quattro volte maggiore rispetto alle vulnerabilità inerenti i file PDF.

I settori verticali più a rischio sono risultati essere il Farmaceutico, Il Chimico, e il settore dell’energia (gas and oil), probabilmente per quest’ultimo ha contribuito anche il malware Night Dragon.

Attività delle BotNET

Le analisi rese possibili dai dati raccolti mediante i sensori IPS e i servizi gestiti hanno consentito di tracciare le attività delle botnet nel periodo preso in esame. I dati hanno evidenziato un leggero aumento del traffico generato dalle Botnet, soprattutto per quanto riguarda Rustock, la rete di macchine compromesse più diffusa, che ha avuto un picco notevole al termine dell’anno.

Per quanto riguarda le signature di attacco maggiormente rilevate, al primo posto spiccano le “Iniezioni SQL” (Generic SQL Injection), a conferma del fatto, indicato da molti produttori, che nel 2011 le vulnerabilità tradizionali verrano utilizzate in modo più strutturato per scopi più ampi (furto di informazioni, hactivisim, etc.).

Interessante notare che ancora nel 2011 sono stati rilevati residuati virali quali Conficker, MyDoom e Slammer. Per contro, a detta del produttore di San Francisco, i virus di tipo più vecchio quali infezioni dei settori di boot e file DOS, sarebbero in via di estinzione (ironia della sorte era appena uscito il report ed è stata rilevata una nuova infezione informatica diretta al Master Boot Record che ha sollevato una certa attenzione nell’ambiente).

Interessante anche l’impatto degli eventi mondiali sulla qualità e quantità del traffico: la rete di sensori Cisco ha difatti rilevato un picco di traffico peer-to-peer (in particolare BitTorrent) nell’ultima parte dell’anno coincidente, temporalmente, con la rivelazione dei “segreti” di Wikilieaks che ha portato gli utenti, viste le misure di arginamento tentate dalle autorità statunitensi, a ricercare vie parallele per avere mano ai documenti.

Meno Spam per tutti!

I produttori di sicurezza raramente vanno d’accordo tra loro, tuttavia, nel caso dello Spam, le indicazioni del gigante di San Jose sono in sostanziale accordo con quelle di McAfee. Il quarto trimestre del 2010 ha registrato un calo considerevole delle mail indesiderate, verosimilmente imputabile alle operazioni di pulizia su vasta scala compiute all’inizio dell’anno passato nei confronti delle grndi botnet: Lethic, Waledac, Mariposa e Zeus; e più avanti nel corso del medesimo anno nei confronti di Pushdo, Bredolab e Koobface.

Report McAfee Q4 2010: Il Malware è Mobile Qual Piuma Al Vento!

February 9, 2011 3 comments

I Laboratori McAfee hanno appena pubblicato il report relativo alle minacce informatiche del quarto trimestre 2010 (McAfee Q4 Threat Report). Oramai sembra un immancabile e monotono refrain ma, tanto per cambiare, nel corso dell’ultimo scorcio del 2010 i malware per i dispositivi mobili l’hanno immancabilmente fatta da padroni.

I dati sono impressionanti: le infezioni dei dispositivi mobili nel corso del 2010 sono cresciute del 46% rispetto all’anno precedente. Nell’anno passato sono stati scoperti 20 milioni di nuovi esemplari di software malevolo, corrispondenti a circa 55.000 nuovi vettori di infezione al giorno. In effetti nel 2010 gli sviluppatori malevoli si sono dati molto da fare se si considera che i Laboratori McAfee hanno identificato in totale 55 milioni di tipologie di malware, da cui su evince che il malware sviluppato nel 2010 corrisponda al 36% del totale.

Una cosa è certa: i cybercriminali si stanno concentrando su dispositivi popolari che garantiscono il  massimo risultato con il minimo sforzo, con una tendenza destinata ad accenturarsi nel 2011 verso un fenomeno che si potrebbe riassumere benissimo con il termine ipocalypse.

I risultati del report si possono così sintetizzare:

Dispositivi mobili sempre più in pericolo per le botnet

Non è una novità, e la mia prima previsione in proposito risale a dicembre 2010 quando, commentando le previsioni di sicurezza Symantec per il 2011, mi ero sbilanciato asserendo che nel corso del 2011 avremmo probabilmente assistito alla nascita di botnet di terminali compromessi. Da lì a breve è stato un climax ascendente che ha portato dapprima alla rilevazione del trojan Geinimi al termine del 2010, ed in seguito alla creazione di un malware botnet-like in laboratorio.

Il report di McAfee conferma questo trend (scusate il gioco di parole), assegna a Geinimi il titolo di una delle minacce più importanti dell’ultimo trimestre 2010, e sancisce perentoriamente che i Cybercriminali utilizzeranno sempre di più, nel corso del 2011, tecniche di botnet per infettare i dispositivi mobili.

I motivi sono presto detti: maggiore popolarità (e portabilità) dei dispositivi mobili come strumenti di lavoro implicano maggiore contenuto sensibile immagazzinato senza le stesse misure di sicurezza e la stessa sensibilità dell’utente (non a caso Geinimi, come anche altre minacce mobili) sono false applicazioni scaricata da market paralleli. D’altronde una botnet di dispositivi mobili ha una duplice valenza malevola: da un lato consente di rubare dati e informazioni sensibili (dalla rubrica alla posizione) dall’altro potrebbe essere utilizzata con intenti malevoli con maggiori capacità di mimetismo all’interno della rete di un operatore mobile (come confermato indirettamente anche dal report di Arbor Networks.

Ad ogni modo nel Q4 2010, Cutwail ha perso lo scettro di botnet più attiva, ad appannaggio della rete di macchine compromesse appartenenti alla rete Rustock, seguita a ruota da Bobax

Almeno una buona notizia, lo Spam è un Periodo di Transizione

Sebbene i mezzi favoriti dai Cybercriminali in questo trimestre siano stati il malware di tipo AutoRun (Generic!atr), i trojan di tipo banking o downloader (PWS or Generic.dx), o anche gli exploit  web-based (StartPage and Exploit-MS04-028), perlomeno si è registrato un leggero abbassamento dei livelli di spam, che sebbene rappresenti ancora l’80% di tutti i messaggi di posta elettronica, si è comunque attestato ai livelli del 1 trimestre 2007. Questo periodo di transizione è verosimilmente dovuto al letargo di alcune botnet (ad esempio Rustock, Letic e Xarvester) e alla chiusura di altre (ad esempio Bredolab o in parte Zeus). In questo trimestre, al vertice delle reti di macchine compromesse si sono posizionate Bobax e Grum.

Se aumentano gli apparati aumentano le minacce web

In base ai dati dell’ultimo trimestre 2010, in cui  i domini malevoli sono cresciuti velocemente grazie alle minacce più attive del calibro di Zeus, Cornficker e Koobface; McAfee rivela che le i vettori di infezione basati sul web continueranno a crescere in dimensioni e complessità , di pari passo con il crescere degli apparati eterogenei che accedono alla rete.

Ovviamente non poteva mancare il phishing e il malvertising e SEO Poisoning in virtù del quale McAfee Labs rivela che all’interno dei primi 100 risultati delle principali ricerche quotidiane, il 51% conduce l’ignaro navigatore verso siti poco sicuri che contengono più di cinque link malevoli. Non è un caso che il produttore rosso preveda che gli attacchi facenti uso di tecniche di manipolazione dei risultati dei motori di ricerca cresceranno notevolmente nel 2011, focalizzandosi soprattutto (tanto per cambiare) ai dispositivi di nuova generazione.

Le vulnerabilità Adobe come mezzo di distribuzione del malware

Nel corso del 2010 le vulnerabilità dei prodotti Adobe (Flash e PDF), inseparabili compagni di navigazione, sono stati il mezzo principale di distribuzione del malware preferito dai Cybercriminali. C’e’ da aspettarsi una inversione di tendenza per il 2011? Nemmeno per idea, almeno secondo McAfee che prevede, per quest’anno, una prosecuzione del trend, anche a causa del supporto per le varie tecnologie Adobe, da parte dei dispositivi mobili e dei sistemi operativi non Microsoft.

Hacktivissimi!

Anche l’hactivism vedrà la sua azione proseguire nel 2011 dopo i botti di fine anno compiuti dal gruppo Anonymous, (e anche il Governo Italiano ne sa qualcosa in questi giorni. Anzi, secondo il produttore dichiara che il confine tra hactivism e cyberwarfare diventerà sempre più confuso.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,944 other followers